Above, Outside the Cedar Tavern, 24 University Place, October 2, 1959.  (Photo by Fred W. McDarrah/Getty Images)  Below, same location, January 2016. Notice on the new image the sign that says 24 hours; back in the day that was where the 24 was to mark the street address on University Place, which was between 8th and 9th Sts. Unlikely the CVS folks knew of that connection. Yes, there is still a drug store on the corner of 8th Street, albeit a very different one.

Above, Outside the Cedar Tavern, 24 University Place, October 2, 1959.  (Photo by Fred W. McDarrah/Getty Images)  Below, same location, January 2016. Notice on the new image the sign that says 24 hours; back in the day that was where the 24 was to mark the street address on University Place, which was between 8th and 9th Sts. Unlikely the CVS folks knew of that connection. Yes, there is still a drug store on the corner of 8th Street, albeit a very different one.

  The now legendary Cedar Tavern was the main hangout for the Abstract Expressionists and the crowd they drew, which included everyone from Frank O'Hara to Jack Kerouac to Bob Dylan.

  Its popularity likely stemmed from its location: many of the artists lived within staggering, uh, walking distance from the bar, Hans Hoffman's art school was two blocks west on 8th Street, a rival art school started by Mark Rothko, Clyfford Still and Robert Motherwell called Subjects of the Artists was a block east on 8th St., the Whitney Museum was one block west and Washington Square Park was just down the street as well. The Waldorf Cafeteria was nearby, as was Rikers (another cafeteria) and the first incarnation of The Artist's Club was nearby on East 8th Street.

   Hear some stories about the place on The Artist's World walking tour.