Fred W. McDarrah photographed the first time that musician Cecil Taylor - now the subject of a career retrospective and series of performances at the Whitney Museum - collaborated with another medium, in this case dance.  The picture is on display now at the museum as part of the historic exhibition.

   Fred W. McDarrah photographed the first time that musician Cecil Taylor - now the subject of a career retrospective and series of performances at the Whitney Museum - collaborated with another medium, in this case dance.  The picture is on display now at the museum as part of the historic exhibition.

  Yawn. Another day, another no-one-else-on-Earth-has-it Fred W. McDarrah photo turns up in a world class institution.

  The McDarrah archive is full of one-of-a-kind images that literally no one else on earth has. Part of the reason is that McDarrah worked for a place - the Village Voice - that covered things that no other media outlets paid any attention to. A bigger part of the reason is that McDarrah was genuinely interested in the downtown scene.

  He always said that while he couldn't paint like deKooning, or make a collage like Rauschenberg, or perform quite like Yoko or Kaprow or Dine, or use TV as a literal art medium like Nam, or make offbeat films like Jonas, or write lyrics like Dylan or prose like Kerouac, or make art out of soup cans or Brillo boxes like you-know-who, what he could do was document what was going around him for future generations. 

   Anyway, the original Whitney Museum on West 8th St. is part of both the Save the Village tour, and the Artist's World tour.

  Come on a tour, hear some fantastic stories, and get some keepsake McDarrah photo postcards.    

  Whitney caption information. McDarrah of course photographed all the Avant Garde festivals too.

  Whitney caption information. McDarrah of course photographed all the Avant Garde festivals too.

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