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Artists Club

Old/New Across from Artist's Club

Above: A row of art galleries on E. 10th Street between 3rd and 4th Avenues, May 25, 1960. Below, same location in March 2016. Photos © Estate of Fred W. McDarrah

Above: A row of art galleries on E. 10th Street between 3rd and 4th Avenues, May 25, 1960. Below, same location in March 2016. Photos © Estate of Fred W. McDarrah

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  That things ain't what they used to be is a song that most people are perhaps bored of hearing.

  But it is an important song.

  The point of all the Save the Village tours is that New York - and everywhere else - needs to learn to strike a balance between progress and preservation. You be the judge: Which version of East 10th St. is preferable? One has decorative stoops, big glass windowed businesses that seem inviting and some personality.

  The other version has uniform brick walls.

  The weather is turning and it is a great time to schedule a walking tour where you can see first hand the changes to various streets and buildings and shake off those winter blahs.

 

Preserve the Artists Club!

Preserve the Artists Club!

 Fred W. McDarrah images are everywhere. Here are two that are part of the ongoing Activism show at the Museum of the City of New York.

And bang the drum slowly for one of the key locales of the Artists walking tour, and the New York School and Abstract Expressionist movement: the famous Artists Club.

According to our friends at EVGrieve, condos are in the works for the corner of 10th St. and 4th Ave., the corner that hosted the greatest incarnation of the famous gathering spot for artists.  http://evgrieve.com/2015/07/10-stories-of-condos-in-works-for-long.html

You can read more about The Club in the Artists Tour web page.

Willem deKooning, the older white haired fellow on the background photo of the Tours page (on the stoop of the New York Hotel Employment Agency) lived and worked down the block from the club at 88 East 10th in the early 1950s. He had moved from just around the corner at 85 Fourth Avenue. By 1960 he had sold a few pictures and rented a studio space at 831 Broadway (located across the street and just south of the Regal 14 Union Square cinema; an apartment that was later carved out of deKooning's space recently rented for $8900 per month). In 1963, DeKooning decamped for Springs, a budding artist's community in East Hampton, where he lived and work until he died in 1997.