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McDarrah

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Tangled up in Admiration

  Congratulations to the winner of the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature, Bob Dylan.

  Here is a vintage Fred W. McDarrah image of Bob, standing in Sheridan Square, outside the offices of the Village Voice, on January 22, 1965.

  The Save the Village: The Beats and Bob Dylan tour goes by this locale, and features several classic Dylan photos. 

  Sign up for a tour today!

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Get ready to sing Happy Birthday to Bob

Rob Stoner, Joan Baez, Bob Dylan and Eric Anderson on stage at Gerde's Folk City, 130 West 3rd Street, October 23, 1975. Playing in honor of club owner Mike Porco's 61st birthday, the performance was also a dry run for Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue tour, which began a week later. Photo © Estate of Fred W. McDarrah.  

Rob Stoner, Joan Baez, Bob Dylan and Eric Anderson on stage at Gerde's Folk City, 130 West 3rd Street, October 23, 1975. Playing in honor of club owner Mike Porco's 61st birthday, the performance was also a dry run for Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue tour, which began a week later. Photo © Estate of Fred W. McDarrah.
 

   This Fred W. McDarrah photograph is about to come back to life.

   On May 24, 2016, Bob Dylan's 75th birthday, Bob Porco, grandson of Gerde' Folk City impresario Mike Porco, is hosting an All Star lineup of acts he has put together to wish Dylan a Happy Birthday.

   The event will by emcee'd by musician Rob Stoner (far left in photo), and many of Gerde's past performers, including possibly some of the others in the photo (Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Eric Anderson), will play. 

  For tickets and info: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/subterranean-75th-birthday-salute-to-bob-dylan-tickets-20145794614

   Meanwhile, the only regularly scheduled guided tours in New York (or anywhere else) about Bob Dylan rev up for the spring with some new photos for tour-goers and some new tour stops.

  The tour kicks off every Sunday at 11 am and Tuesday at 2 pm, and privately by appointment.

  See's Dylan hangouts, hideouts and homes, the clubs and bars he frequented and much more.

   All of it was captured by 50-year Village Voice photographer Fred W. McDarrah who uniquely documented not only Dylan but 1960s events and icons like Warhol, Mailer, Stonewall, Kerouac, Hendrix and more. Each walker gets a keepsake multi-postcard set of classic McDarrah images and the tours go to the same locations to see how they have changed,  how they are the same, and to hear the stories behind the famous photos. 

  The Dylan tour is one of several walking tours based on McDarrah's iconic photographs. Others include The Artist's World and The East Village. Learn more and book a New York Times-recommended tour today at

  Don't think twice, it's alright.

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NOW ON FACEBOOK:
https://www.facebook.com/savethevillagewalkingtours
On Groupon:
https://www.groupon.com/deals/save-the-village-tours

 

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New Tour Starts Soon

A section of Washington Place next to Sheridan Square Park was renamed in honor of folk legend and Dylan pal Dave Van Ronk. His ex-wife lives near this sign and the Van Ronk name is still on the outside buzzer.

A section of Washington Place next to Sheridan Square Park was renamed in honor of folk legend and Dylan pal Dave Van Ronk. His ex-wife lives near this sign and the Van Ronk name is still on the outside buzzer.

The Beats and Bob(Dylan) Tour gets underway November 10.

We had mused about it earlier. And while we were preparing the Literary/Beats tour, and out doing the Save the Village walking tour, it became clear. Sadly, few people know, remember, had to read in school, or know much about Village literary legends like Willa Cather, Edith Wharton, John Dos Passos, ee cummings, Djuna Barnes, Henry James, William Styron, Theodore Dreiser, John Reed, etc.

But most people know of Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg. And of course everyone knows Bob Dylan. So we'll keep mentioning the vintage Village literary crew. Maybe it'll spark some interest.  And we'll focus on what the people know, and seem to want. 

Allen and Bob met in the Village, at a party above the old 8th St. Bookshop in 1963, and became lifelong friends. They were both products of the Eisenhower '50s, and rebelled against it in their own ways. The world of the Beats and the Folk Music scene that Dylan migrated to both were centered on the same Village street (MacDougal) and both socialized and performed at the same venues.

So a tour that tells their concurrent tales seemed like a smart way to move forward.

Hope you all agree! 

The original Save the Village Tour will continue, of course. And soon the Artists tour (more overlap with Allen and Bob. Was quite a different world back then) and the East Village tour will both kick off.

 

Save the Hamptons!!?

Entertaining story in the New York Times today about how the Hamptons are being battered by wealth, interlopers, drunken revelers, Uber-style helicopter companies, nightclubs run by city folk, etc. La plus ca change, right?  

(And hats off to the writer, Jim Rutenberg, has come a long way from his days as our inexperienced sidekick at a Manhattan weekly and at a New York daily.)   

We spent many summers (and other seasons) out East, starting in the sepia-toned days (1960s, 1970s, 1980s) when we could pick up a phone book to find the address and phone number of interview subjects, ranging from Juan Trippe and William Simon  (Google them, kids) to Larry Rivers and Chuck Close. Celebrities and moguls might have had an unlisted number in New York City, but most never thought to do the same for their summer home.

But the point, and we do have one, is that in the same way that what made Greenwich Village appealing is slowly being destroyed, the same thing is happening in East Hampton, and a whole lot of other places.

Main St. and Newtown Lane in East Hampton is now DKNY Tiffany Ralph Lauren Marc Jacobs. Local businesses are a rarity. The quaint old movie place is now a multiplex. Dumpy old Ma Bergman's has for decades been the celebrity eatery Nick & Toni's (though they are actually good members of the community and the least of the problems in the Hamptons). The open space is being slowly eaten up. Hard to screw with the natural light that made the area a haven to painters from Pollock to deKooning to you name them, but can buildings like the behemoths that line West 57th St and cast a shadow into Central Park one day line Three Mile Harbor Road and cast a shadow over Accabonac Creek?

I hear you laughing at the absurdity of a 100-story building in East Hampton. However, it is not that funny. Zoning laws can change with enough financial power, as can most anything else. Some things should not be for sale, such as our collective history. Even Mr. Met isn't happy about it.  

Mr. Met after seeing Shea Stadium demolished. He understands progress but understands that sometimes preserving history is more important.

Mr. Met after seeing Shea Stadium demolished. He understands progress but understands that sometimes preserving history is more important.

New McDarrah prints available for first time

This may not be a typical blog post - it is more of a press release.  But since we wrote it, seems like fair use.

PHOTOS.COM by GETTY IMAGES SNAPS UP LEGENDARY VILLAGE VOICE PHOTOGRAPHER FRED W. McDARRAH 

New Prints of Classic Greenwich Village Images Available For First Time

Photos.com proudly announces the addition of the Fred W. McDarrah Collection.

Fred W. McDarrah was the most curious, knowledgeable, and indefatigable chronicler of the New York scene over the second half of the 20th century. 

His work brings a new and unique selection of images to the collected works of an already world class Photos.com lineup including Alfred Eisenstadt, Margaret Bourke-White and Ansel Adams.

McDarrah rose to prominence during his 50-year association with the Village Voice newspaper, the house organ of the post-war counterculture. The New York Times has described McDarrah as the "Bachrach of New York's Bohemia."

He photographed the artists, writers, musicians, and actors who frequented the bars, theaters, galleries, and cafes in Greenwich Village. He documented political rallies, museum openings, breaking news, feminism, experimental theater, the rock and folk music scenes, dance, and the civil rights and anti-war movements. In a style simple and direct McDarrah created street and studio portraits of luminaries, politicians and celebrities that were often definitive.

But his favorite subject may have been his beloved New York City; often roaming the city on his bicycle, he documented the streets, buildings, landmarks, parks, beaches, pushcarts, subways, architecture, landscapes, churches, signs, cobblestones, storefronts and rooftops.

McDarrah's photographs have been exhibited at numerous museums, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Wadsworth Atheneum and the Centre Georges Pompidou-Paris; and are in private and public collections including the National Portrait Gallery, the J. Paul Getty Museum, the New York Public Library, the Andy Warhol Museum, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

For The Fred W. McDarrah Collection, the editors at Photos.com have selected more than 200 of McDarrah’s most delightful and inspiring images, with an eye towards their ability to work as wall décor. Many of the images shown here are available to the consumer market for the very first time.

About Photos.com by Getty Images:

Built on Getty Images’ unrivaled archive and exclusive collections from a wide range of world-renowned photographers, Photos.com by Getty Images is a full service printing and framing e-commerce business.  Every image is available in four sizes and five framing options: paper, canvas, acrylic, birchwood & aluminum, and arrives at your doorstep framed and ready-to-hang.  With more than 250,000 images spanning current events and famous faces to world culture, contemporary concepts and iconic black-and-white photography, there’s something to inspire and complement every interior style.

Photos.com by Getty Images is not affiliated with the J. Paul Getty Trust or its operating programs including the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Getty Research Institute, the Getty Conservation Institute, and the Getty Foundation.

For more information about the Fred W. McDarrah Collection or Photos.com, please contact Director of Marketing Katherine Wells: Katherine.wells@gettyimages.com