Viewing entries tagged
Washington Square Park

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It's official! The drug dealers win!

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The two fellows with baseball caps and red footwear on the left side of the frame are well known to Save the Village tour guests; they offer folks marijuana regularly. This morning as I passed them, alone, they offered me some too. (I declined.)

When I saw two of New York's Finest and two Park Rangers approaching, I stopped and turned around, wondering how they'd react - both the cops and drug dealers.

But no one even broke stride.

The street entrepreneurs continued to shout out to passersby that they had killer weed, and the uniformed personnel, well within earshot of the dealers, could not have cared less about the sales going on right in their path. They just kept on going, smiling and laughing.

I guess it is official! Washington Square Park has gone to Pot!

So, our friends at The Village Alliance and Washington Square Park Conservancy and New York University can officially stop asking the 6th precinct what they are doing to combat drug sales near the playgrounds. Obviously, they have given up.

That said, everyone should still come on a Save the Village tour! Interesting, informative, amusing, good exercise and who knows what you will see!

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HBD, BD!

(Photo by Fred W. McDarrah/Getty Images)

(Photo by Fred W. McDarrah/Getty Images)

Happy 76th Birthday, Robert!

Here's Bob with, from left, his old musical director Rob Stoner, Joan Baez and Eric Andersen on stage at Gerde's Folk City, 130 West 3rd Street, New York, October 23, 1975.

They were singing Happy Birthday to club owner Mike Porco on his 61st birthday. The rest of the impromptu performance was in effect a dry run for Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue concert tour, which began a few days later.

Porco's grandson Mike Porco hosed a 75th birthday party for Dylan in the same space last year.

The location, the whole story, and so much more about Dylan, are on the Save the Village tours.

Book one today!

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Celeb Central

  Last season, tour groups ran into all kinds of recognizable faces, from Daniel Day Lewis to Philip Glass to some celebrity chefs (Batali, Bouloud).

  Here is one guy the tour won't run into: the late John Belushi, snapped by Fred W. McDarrah in front of Belusi's pad at 376 Bleecker St. (there is now a Cynthia Rowley store on the ground floor there).

  Book a 2017 tour today at SavetheVillagetours.com.

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Famous faces

 Newland Archer, out of character

 Newland Archer, out of character

  A Save the Village tour-goer started talking to a passing fellow as he waited for The Beats and Bob Dylan tour to start on Tuesday, near the corner of MacDougal Alley and MacDougal Street. Finally the tour-goer said to the fellow, "You look an awful lot like Daniel Day-Lewis." Seems it was.

  Lewis was heading to Washington Square Park to enjoy the warm afternoon, where the tour group passed him as he lazed on a bench. Lewis nodded hello, and the group continued on its way.

  He is often seen out and about downtown. He and his wife, filmmaker Rebecca Miller (progeny of playwright Arthur Miller and Magnum photographer Inge Morath) live on West 10th St., a few blocks from Miller's college roommate, feminist author Naomi Wolf.

  Twice lately the tour crossed paths with croc-clad Babbo chef Mario Battali, tapped by the Obamas to cater their last state dinner.

  Just part of the fabric of the greatest neighborhood on earth.

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Flighty attraction

  In addition to the usual stops, the morning Save the Village tour group enjoyed seeing a pigeon aficionado in Washington Square Park.

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Neighborly

Taped to a bench in Washington Square Park the other day.

Taped to a bench in Washington Square Park the other day.

Don't know if the owner ever got his/her bike back, but someone did seem to make a mighty effort to reunite them!

Arch-ly

A shot the tourists love - arch framing the Empire State. Next week it'll be blocked by the Christmas tree.

A shot the tourists love - arch framing the Empire State. Next week it'll be blocked by the Christmas tree.

  One of the most photographed icons in New York City, other than - for the time being - Donald Trump, is the Washington Square Arch.

  Erected to mark the 100th anniversary of George Washington being inaugurated (as president, in 1889... as he was not inauguratred for anything else if memory serves) and originally made out of wood, the marble Sanford White version that is there now was dedicated in 1895.

  It is still the center of the known universe to an awful lot of people.

  Last week there was an impromptu memorial to the Paris tragedy underneath.

  Now it is back to bums and performers (see below). 

On December 1, the holiday tree was installed, while some street people took up residence on the west side of the arch and a banjo player entertained them from the east side.

On December 1, the holiday tree was installed, while some street people took up residence on the west side of the arch and a banjo player entertained them from the east side.

 

King Edward (Hopper)

Just another Village painter. Not.

Just another Village painter. Not.

Well, unlike Edgar Allen Poe's house, the Provincetown Playhouse, Café Bizarre, the House of Genius and scores of other historic Village spots, NYU was unable to demolish Edward Hopper's place, although they did work for decades to evict him.

The landmarked Washington Square North exterior, along with a plaque, is all that remains of the studio where Nighthawks was painted, the most famous American piece of art ever created (with no apologies, really, to American Gothic, Campbell's Tomato Soup, Christina's World, One: Number 31, 1950, Washington Crossing the Delaware or Whistler's Mother).

 The building is part of the Artist's World tour, which takes place every Saturday at 12 noon. And a great Fred W. McDarrah portrait of Hopper in his studio is one of the keepsake postcards given out on the tour.

 

The studio where Hopper painted  Nighthawks  is - was - atop 3 Washington Square North.

The studio where Hopper painted Nighthawks is - was - atop 3 Washington Square North.

Arch is a triumph

A memorial to the sad events in Paris under the Washington Square Park arch.  

A memorial to the sad events in Paris under the Washington Square Park arch.  

A memorial with flowers, candles, chalk-written words on the sidewalk of encouragement and strength, paintings, sculptures and singers is growing under the arch in Washington Square Park.

The Beats and Bob Dylan, The Artist's World and the Save the Village tours all pass the arch.

Not much to say beyond encouraging folks to stop and see what is there, read the words, feel the power of the words Resist In Peace that were scrawled across the arch and hope that the stupidity and ignorance behind the acts never repeats itself. 

Part of the memorial under the arch.

Part of the memorial under the arch.

Labor Day

Three plaques mark the location of 1911's Triangle Shirtwaist fire on Greene St and Washington Place.

Three plaques mark the location of 1911's Triangle Shirtwaist fire on Greene St and Washington Place.

To mark Labor Day, we wandered a bit off the path of the tours (going two blocks east of Washington Square Park) to the site of 1911's Triangle Shirtwaist fire. The blaze took 146 lives, most of them young female garment center workers. The workers were locked into their workplace and many jumped from ten floors up to try and escape the flames.  It remains the city's deadliest industrial accident and led to changes in the fire codes, factory safety and spurred the growth of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union.

The building is both a national and a city landmark. Close ups of the three plaques are below. They speak for themselves.     

New McDarrah prints available for first time

This may not be a typical blog post - it is more of a press release.  But since we wrote it, seems like fair use.

PHOTOS.COM by GETTY IMAGES SNAPS UP LEGENDARY VILLAGE VOICE PHOTOGRAPHER FRED W. McDARRAH 

New Prints of Classic Greenwich Village Images Available For First Time

Photos.com proudly announces the addition of the Fred W. McDarrah Collection.

Fred W. McDarrah was the most curious, knowledgeable, and indefatigable chronicler of the New York scene over the second half of the 20th century. 

His work brings a new and unique selection of images to the collected works of an already world class Photos.com lineup including Alfred Eisenstadt, Margaret Bourke-White and Ansel Adams.

McDarrah rose to prominence during his 50-year association with the Village Voice newspaper, the house organ of the post-war counterculture. The New York Times has described McDarrah as the "Bachrach of New York's Bohemia."

He photographed the artists, writers, musicians, and actors who frequented the bars, theaters, galleries, and cafes in Greenwich Village. He documented political rallies, museum openings, breaking news, feminism, experimental theater, the rock and folk music scenes, dance, and the civil rights and anti-war movements. In a style simple and direct McDarrah created street and studio portraits of luminaries, politicians and celebrities that were often definitive.

But his favorite subject may have been his beloved New York City; often roaming the city on his bicycle, he documented the streets, buildings, landmarks, parks, beaches, pushcarts, subways, architecture, landscapes, churches, signs, cobblestones, storefronts and rooftops.

McDarrah's photographs have been exhibited at numerous museums, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Wadsworth Atheneum and the Centre Georges Pompidou-Paris; and are in private and public collections including the National Portrait Gallery, the J. Paul Getty Museum, the New York Public Library, the Andy Warhol Museum, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

For The Fred W. McDarrah Collection, the editors at Photos.com have selected more than 200 of McDarrah’s most delightful and inspiring images, with an eye towards their ability to work as wall décor. Many of the images shown here are available to the consumer market for the very first time.

About Photos.com by Getty Images:

Built on Getty Images’ unrivaled archive and exclusive collections from a wide range of world-renowned photographers, Photos.com by Getty Images is a full service printing and framing e-commerce business.  Every image is available in four sizes and five framing options: paper, canvas, acrylic, birchwood & aluminum, and arrives at your doorstep framed and ready-to-hang.  With more than 250,000 images spanning current events and famous faces to world culture, contemporary concepts and iconic black-and-white photography, there’s something to inspire and complement every interior style.

Photos.com by Getty Images is not affiliated with the J. Paul Getty Trust or its operating programs including the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Getty Research Institute, the Getty Conservation Institute, and the Getty Foundation.

For more information about the Fred W. McDarrah Collection or Photos.com, please contact Director of Marketing Katherine Wells: Katherine.wells@gettyimages.com

 

Thanks, New York Times!

Save the Village (every Tuesday) Last year the Steven Kasher Gallery in Chelsea put on an exhibition with the photography of Fred W. McDarrah, who documented the changing scene of Greenwich Village since the 1960s. Now, the spirit of that show has taken the form of this walking tour, which includes stops at the places McDarrah captured on film: locales like Washington Square Park and the Stonewall Inn. At 10 a.m.; the tour meets at Christopher Park, Stonewall Place, at Seventh Avenue, West Village, savethevillagetours.com.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/21/arts/spare-times-for-aug-21-27.html