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bobdylan

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HBD, BD!

(Photo by Fred W. McDarrah/Getty Images)

(Photo by Fred W. McDarrah/Getty Images)

Happy 76th Birthday, Robert!

Here's Bob with, from left, his old musical director Rob Stoner, Joan Baez and Eric Andersen on stage at Gerde's Folk City, 130 West 3rd Street, New York, October 23, 1975.

They were singing Happy Birthday to club owner Mike Porco on his 61st birthday. The rest of the impromptu performance was in effect a dry run for Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue concert tour, which began a few days later.

Porco's grandson Mike Porco hosed a 75th birthday party for Dylan in the same space last year.

The location, the whole story, and so much more about Dylan, are on the Save the Village tours.

Book one today!

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Thanks for the good words

The most recent Trip Advisor accolade, posted this week:

FIVE STARS

I was lucky enough to go on a tour of the Village with emphasis on places Bob Dylan lived, performed, sat for pictures, etc that was led by Tim McDarrah, Fred McDarrah's son. Fred was photographer for the Village Voice for many years and it is no surprise that Tim has an insider's consummate knowledge of the Village. Highly recommended...

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Warm Day, Hot Tour

Thanks, Mark Greenberg, for capturing our tour guide so elegantly.

Greenberg, a photo collector with works by Edward Steichen and Adolf De Meyer (Vogue's first staff photographer) on his bedroom wall, (presumably) enjoyed Tuesday's "Save the Village: The Beats and Bob Dylan" tour.

It was a warm, sunny day even if there was some extra hot air coming from someone.

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Spring into tour season!

Bob Dylan, Christopher Park, January 22, 1965. Photo by Fred W. McDarrah.

Bob Dylan, Christopher Park, January 22, 1965. Photo by Fred W. McDarrah.

It is nearly 80 degrees in Greenwich Village this morning - perfect for a walking tour.

The Beats and Bob Dylan: Save the Village tour is on tap this afternoon to start a busy and exciting season.

Book your tour today! 

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Famous faces

 Newland Archer, out of character

 Newland Archer, out of character

  A Save the Village tour-goer started talking to a passing fellow as he waited for The Beats and Bob Dylan tour to start on Tuesday, near the corner of MacDougal Alley and MacDougal Street. Finally the tour-goer said to the fellow, "You look an awful lot like Daniel Day-Lewis." Seems it was.

  Lewis was heading to Washington Square Park to enjoy the warm afternoon, where the tour group passed him as he lazed on a bench. Lewis nodded hello, and the group continued on its way.

  He is often seen out and about downtown. He and his wife, filmmaker Rebecca Miller (progeny of playwright Arthur Miller and Magnum photographer Inge Morath) live on West 10th St., a few blocks from Miller's college roommate, feminist author Naomi Wolf.

  Twice lately the tour crossed paths with croc-clad Babbo chef Mario Battali, tapped by the Obamas to cater their last state dinner.

  Just part of the fabric of the greatest neighborhood on earth.

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Take A Tour Today!

In the wake of the Nobel Prize announcement this week, it may be a good time to consider this: "Save the Village: Walking Tours of the Photographs of Fred W. McDarrah - The Beats and Bob Dylan."

This is the ONLY regularly scheduled Dylan-themed walking tour in New York. It runs every Tuesday at 2 pm, or privately by appointment

For each of the four Save the Village tours, walkers get a keepsake multi-postcard set of classic images by Fred W. McDarrah, the first photographer for the Village Voice. The tours go to the same locations as where the photos were taken, to see how things have changed, how they are the same and to hear the stories behind the famous photos.

Tickets and info are here: http://www.savethevillagetours.com/

See you there!

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Tangled up in Admiration

  Congratulations to the winner of the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature, Bob Dylan.

  Here is a vintage Fred W. McDarrah image of Bob, standing in Sheridan Square, outside the offices of the Village Voice, on January 22, 1965.

  The Save the Village: The Beats and Bob Dylan tour goes by this locale, and features several classic Dylan photos. 

  Sign up for a tour today!

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Get ready to sing Happy Birthday to Bob

Rob Stoner, Joan Baez, Bob Dylan and Eric Anderson on stage at Gerde's Folk City, 130 West 3rd Street, October 23, 1975. Playing in honor of club owner Mike Porco's 61st birthday, the performance was also a dry run for Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue tour, which began a week later. Photo © Estate of Fred W. McDarrah.  

Rob Stoner, Joan Baez, Bob Dylan and Eric Anderson on stage at Gerde's Folk City, 130 West 3rd Street, October 23, 1975. Playing in honor of club owner Mike Porco's 61st birthday, the performance was also a dry run for Dylan's Rolling Thunder Revue tour, which began a week later. Photo © Estate of Fred W. McDarrah.
 

   This Fred W. McDarrah photograph is about to come back to life.

   On May 24, 2016, Bob Dylan's 75th birthday, Bob Porco, grandson of Gerde' Folk City impresario Mike Porco, is hosting an All Star lineup of acts he has put together to wish Dylan a Happy Birthday.

   The event will by emcee'd by musician Rob Stoner (far left in photo), and many of Gerde's past performers, including possibly some of the others in the photo (Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Eric Anderson), will play. 

  For tickets and info: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/subterranean-75th-birthday-salute-to-bob-dylan-tickets-20145794614

   Meanwhile, the only regularly scheduled guided tours in New York (or anywhere else) about Bob Dylan rev up for the spring with some new photos for tour-goers and some new tour stops.

  The tour kicks off every Sunday at 11 am and Tuesday at 2 pm, and privately by appointment.

  See's Dylan hangouts, hideouts and homes, the clubs and bars he frequented and much more.

   All of it was captured by 50-year Village Voice photographer Fred W. McDarrah who uniquely documented not only Dylan but 1960s events and icons like Warhol, Mailer, Stonewall, Kerouac, Hendrix and more. Each walker gets a keepsake multi-postcard set of classic McDarrah images and the tours go to the same locations to see how they have changed,  how they are the same, and to hear the stories behind the famous photos. 

  The Dylan tour is one of several walking tours based on McDarrah's iconic photographs. Others include The Artist's World and The East Village. Learn more and book a New York Times-recommended tour today at

  Don't think twice, it's alright.

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NOW ON FACEBOOK:
https://www.facebook.com/savethevillagewalkingtours
On Groupon:
https://www.groupon.com/deals/save-the-village-tours

 

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Big Corner: MacDougal and Bleecker

Plaque erected by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation marking where the San Remo bar once stood. Photo © Estate of Fred W. McDarrah

Plaque erected by the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation marking where the San Remo bar once stood. Photo © Estate of Fred W. McDarrah

 

  The San Remo was a bar at 93 MacDougal St. at the corner of Bleecker. In its heyday it was across from the Café Borgia and the Figaro. Big destination corner.

  Now 93 MacDougal is a crappy chain coffee store.

  It was a hangout for folks like... well, look on the plaque.  Now, not so much.

  Jack Kerouac described the bar's crowd in his novel The Subterraneans, which is based in large part on the San Remo:

Hip without being slick, intelligent without being corny, they are intellectual as hell and know all about (Ezra) Pound without being pretentious or saying too much about it. They are very quiet, they are very Christlike.

  Save the Village indeed. If it is not already too late.

  Dylan's song Subterranean Homesick Blues also is derivative of the place. Take one of the Save the Village tours and learn more. And have fun doing it.

BLONDE ON WHERE?

Album cover photo by Daniel Kramer. Taken in front of Albert Grossman's former residence at 4 Gramercy Park West. Overlay with album cover from PopSpotsNYC.com.

Album cover photo by Daniel Kramer. Taken in front of Albert Grossman's former residence at 4 Gramercy Park West. Overlay with album cover from PopSpotsNYC.com.

The reason the Internet exists is so people like my friend Bob Egan can teach us.

He runs the marvelous popspotsnyc.com, which explores local locales where the lost art of album covers is dissected.

Lou Reed, Billy Joel, the Stones, the Dead, Bruce, the Ramones, KISS, Blondie, Woody Guthrie, and other local (and not so local) bands used NYC as the set for their cover shoots. And Bob, like a Law & Order detective, or a good Woodward and Bernstein disciple, takes the best of them and reports on his delightfully exhaustive journeys to find the EXACT spots the band was photographed.      

His Highway 61 journey is here:

http://www.popspotsnyc.com/highway61revisited/index.html

Gramercy Park is a bit off from the route of our new The Beats and Bob (Dylan) tour, but the tour does go by the Jones St. locale of the Freewheelin' Bob Dylan cover photo. And lots of other Dylan hangouts.

Fred W. McDarrah's photo contemporary (and our old college professor) John Cohen and Cohen's early film footage of Dylan is here:

http://www.popspotsnyc.com/john_cohen_roof/

But really, go to the web site and read every word, and look at every photo. It is not quite a substitute for going on a good invigorating walking tour, but it is endlessly fascinating both from its reporting, the history and how the songs on the records he discusses still echo in one's head.

He is still on a mission - to find where the Blonde on Blonde cover was shot. Any ideas? Let him know.  

 

Grossman's former digs, December 2015.  

Grossman's former digs, December 2015.  

The Iceman Cameth... So others did too

Plaque in Golden Swan Park at corner of West 4th St. and Avenue of the Americas. It is the same West 4th St. that Bob Dylan sings about and lived on.

Plaque in Golden Swan Park at corner of West 4th St. and Avenue of the Americas. It is the same West 4th St. that Bob Dylan sings about and lived on.

Big reason folks like the Beats and Bob Dylan came to the Village was to follow in the achieving creative footsteps of folks like Eugene O'Neill.

As the plaque above says, the bar that was the inspiration for "The Iceman Cometh" and the off Broadway venue that hosted its premiere were both in Greenwich Village.

The Beats and Bob Dylan Walking Tour passes by this corner and many other important locations in the Village literary canon.

Special holiday tour added Saturday November 28th at 12 noon.  

The location of the former Hell Hole is now a park often used to host recycling efforts.

The location of the former Hell Hole is now a park often used to host recycling efforts.

SOME PRESS FOR NEW BEATS / DYLAN TOUR

Both Bob Dylan and his pal Allen Ginsberg would come, separately, to feel the vibe of Edgar Allen Poe. In its infinite wisdom, NYU tore the place down and left a plaque and a façade (below).  

Both Bob Dylan and his pal Allen Ginsberg would come, separately, to feel the vibe of Edgar Allen Poe. In its infinite wisdom, NYU tore the place down and left a plaque and a façade (below).  

The new tour The Beats and Bob (Dylan) kicked off the other day.

So far so good. The connections and relationships between Dylan and Ginsberg, Kerouac and friends are fascinating to explore. And so much took place in the South Village.

http://gvshp.org/blog/2015/11/10/the-historic-south-village-home-of-the-beats-and-bob-dylan/

Our friends at the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation made mention.

The tour passes the pictured Edgar Allen Poe location. Dylan and Ginsberg would both make regular pilgrimages to the spot and meditate about Poe. Both men often referenced Poe in their work.

Dylan's 1965 song "Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues" for example makes reference to "Rue Morgue Avenue" which is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe published in Graham's Magazine in 1841. It has been recognized as the first modern detective story

In the Summer of 1939, when 13-year-old Allen graduated from grammar school he listed Poe as his favorite author.

In May 1944, he published in the Columbia Jester Review, "A Night in the Village with Edgar Allen Ginsberg" according to Ginsberg's Estate's web site.

And famously, from "Howl".... "who studied Plotinus Poe St John of the Cross telepathy and bop kabbalah because the universe instinctively vibrated at their feet."

"Everything leads to Poe,"\ Ginz once said. "You can trace all literary art to Poe's influence: Burroughs, Baudelaire, Genet, Dylan...It all leads back to Poe."  

Save the Village: Walking Tours of the Photographs of Fred W. McDarrah / The Beats and Bob leaves from the corner of MacDougal Street and MacDougal Alley every Tuesday at 2 pm, or privately by appointment.    

Where Poe never actually lived, but a reasonable copy thereof.

Where Poe never actually lived, but a reasonable copy thereof.