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christopher park

Sheridan Sq-Where?

   A statue honoring Civil War Gen. Sheridan (photo above) is located in Christopher Park (photo below), not Sheridan Square, which is located nearby.  Typical Village street confusion.

  The Yellowstone Park advocate, and one time NRA president incidentally has no connection to the Village. He claimed in his memoirs that he was born in Albany, but other possibilities that have been cited and documented are Somerset, Ohio (where he grew up); Boston; and onboard a ship sailing to New York from Ireland. One biographer points out that Sheridan harbored presidential ambitions from an early age and could have deliberately claimed a U.S. birthplace to retain eligibility for the office.

  Sheridan and his wife moved to Washington, D.C. in 1872. They lived in a house given to them by Chicago citizens in appreciation for Sheridan's protection of the city after the Great Chicago Fire in 1871.

  Popular culture correctly credits Sheridan with saying "The only good Indian is a dead Indian." He was appointed by President Grant to lord over the Great Plains after the Civil War.

  His burial at Arlington National Cemetery in 1888 helped elevate Arlington to national prominence.

groupon redux

Groupon Approved: George Segal's sculpture "Four Figures" in front of the Parks dept. interpretive sign with a Fred W. McDarrah photo, in Christopher Park. The park is directly across the street from Stonewall.

Groupon Approved: George Segal's sculpture "Four Figures" in front of the Parks dept. interpretive sign with a Fred W. McDarrah photo, in Christopher Park. The park is directly across the street from Stonewall.

Well the folks at Groupon ultimately refused to use a Fred W. McDarrah image on the deal page for Save the Village Tours.

They did use this snapshot taken by yours truly. They did not ask about the copyright, and were thrilled that it is a color photo, and in focus.

Check it out: https://www.groupon.com/deals/save-the-village-tours 

Groupon, poo-pon

Bob Dylan in Christoper Park, Sheridan Square, January 22, 1965

Bob Dylan in Christoper Park, Sheridan Square, January 22, 1965

Nice photo, right?

Not according to Groupon.

"merchantsupport@groupon.com

Hi Timothy,

Thanks for procuring and attaching this photo for your deal, we really appreciate it. However, we're not able to use it. From a design perspective we're trying to strike a balance between images that accurately depict the customer experience and high-quality, professional photography with sharp focus and eye-catching colors. The image you attached just didn't meet our quality standards, but feel free to send us another image that meets the requirements.

Regards,
Ashwaty"

Wow. Not up to their quality standards. And they prefer color and not black and white.  Of course they only consider high quality professional photography, and in focus. Same reply for several other images submitted. 

Vintage Fred W. McDarrah prints can sell for $10,000, and are in the collections of MoMA, the Whitney and on the walls of the Pompidou, Pace Gallery, etc. But that's apparently not enough for the good folks that get you discounts on all you can eat sushi.

Still trying to work with them to get the tours on Groupon. An education for all involved.

 

As we were saying...

Tour-goers photograph George Segal's "Four Figures" and the Park Dept. interpretive sign (with Fred W. McDarrah image) at Christopher Park, which lawmakers are now pushing for National Park status.  Stonewall is in background with the green scaffolding.

Tour-goers photograph George Segal's "Four Figures" and the Park Dept. interpretive sign (with Fred W. McDarrah image) at Christopher Park, which lawmakers are now pushing for National Park status.  Stonewall is in background with the green scaffolding.

As we reported a few weeks back (scroll down), there is a push to create a national park at Christopher Park to honor the 1969 Stonewall Riots.

Now the movement is getting bigger.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/21/nyregion/lawmakers-seek-national-park-in-honor-of-stonewall.html?ref=nyregion&_r=0  

Excellent. More plaques to go up for us to photograph! Nah. Seriously, federally protected status won't much change anything in the park itself, as the current owner, the City of New York, isn't about to do anything to fudge things up. But it could help in preserving the Stonewall façade, ensure funds from Washington D.C. to maintain the park and streets around it, and it adds another level of legitimacy and gravitas to the location.   

And it couldn't hurt with preserving other landmarked and non-landmarked but vitally important historic places in New York on the Save the Village walking tour route, and elsewhere.

When Is Kickoff?

Green Bay Packers fans awaiting a Sunday opening of the Kettle of Fish bar, which hosts gathering of Wisconsin sports fans.

Green Bay Packers fans awaiting a Sunday opening of the Kettle of Fish bar, which hosts gathering of Wisconsin sports fans.

A funny thing happened on the way to the tour the other Sunday. There was quite a crowd across the street from Christopher Park, the kick off point for the Save The Village tour. But as we quickly learned, they were not there for an entertaining two hours learning about the Village or why there needs to be a real balance between progress and preservation.

They had not heard of the Village Voice, and while most were not from New York, they were not tourists. More like interlopers. From Wisconsin, of all places.

Fans of most out of town football teams - college and pro (as if there is a difference!) have an adopted New York bar where they gather to watch and root for their old school team, or their hometown NFL team.

The Kettle of Fish, which has a proprietor who used to be a Wisconsin Badger, is where Green Bay Packers fans come to watch their team play. (Badger college football fans gather there too, apparently.) And they gather before 10 am for a 1 pm game. Or even for a 4 pm game. Anything to get a good seat by the TV.

Idiotic, I thought. Then I realized it was not much different from our old game plan of being in the Lincoln Tunnel by 9 am to get a nice parking spot in the swamps of the Jersey Meadowlands to tailgate before we'd root for Richard Todd to finally beat Dan Marino.

All the Packers fans were offered a Greenwich Village walking tour sometime to learn more about the significance of the Kettle of Fish, and the Lions Head bar that preceded it, and the Stonewall Inn a few doors down, and all the other historic spots within, well, walking distance.

Nah. To a man (and woman), each and every one of them passed on a golden opportunity to learn something.

Hence the reason they are called Cheeseheads.  

            

New McDarrah prints available for first time

This may not be a typical blog post - it is more of a press release.  But since we wrote it, seems like fair use.

PHOTOS.COM by GETTY IMAGES SNAPS UP LEGENDARY VILLAGE VOICE PHOTOGRAPHER FRED W. McDARRAH 

New Prints of Classic Greenwich Village Images Available For First Time

Photos.com proudly announces the addition of the Fred W. McDarrah Collection.

Fred W. McDarrah was the most curious, knowledgeable, and indefatigable chronicler of the New York scene over the second half of the 20th century. 

His work brings a new and unique selection of images to the collected works of an already world class Photos.com lineup including Alfred Eisenstadt, Margaret Bourke-White and Ansel Adams.

McDarrah rose to prominence during his 50-year association with the Village Voice newspaper, the house organ of the post-war counterculture. The New York Times has described McDarrah as the "Bachrach of New York's Bohemia."

He photographed the artists, writers, musicians, and actors who frequented the bars, theaters, galleries, and cafes in Greenwich Village. He documented political rallies, museum openings, breaking news, feminism, experimental theater, the rock and folk music scenes, dance, and the civil rights and anti-war movements. In a style simple and direct McDarrah created street and studio portraits of luminaries, politicians and celebrities that were often definitive.

But his favorite subject may have been his beloved New York City; often roaming the city on his bicycle, he documented the streets, buildings, landmarks, parks, beaches, pushcarts, subways, architecture, landscapes, churches, signs, cobblestones, storefronts and rooftops.

McDarrah's photographs have been exhibited at numerous museums, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Wadsworth Atheneum and the Centre Georges Pompidou-Paris; and are in private and public collections including the National Portrait Gallery, the J. Paul Getty Museum, the New York Public Library, the Andy Warhol Museum, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

For The Fred W. McDarrah Collection, the editors at Photos.com have selected more than 200 of McDarrah’s most delightful and inspiring images, with an eye towards their ability to work as wall décor. Many of the images shown here are available to the consumer market for the very first time.

About Photos.com by Getty Images:

Built on Getty Images’ unrivaled archive and exclusive collections from a wide range of world-renowned photographers, Photos.com by Getty Images is a full service printing and framing e-commerce business.  Every image is available in four sizes and five framing options: paper, canvas, acrylic, birchwood & aluminum, and arrives at your doorstep framed and ready-to-hang.  With more than 250,000 images spanning current events and famous faces to world culture, contemporary concepts and iconic black-and-white photography, there’s something to inspire and complement every interior style.

Photos.com by Getty Images is not affiliated with the J. Paul Getty Trust or its operating programs including the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Getty Research Institute, the Getty Conservation Institute, and the Getty Foundation.

For more information about the Fred W. McDarrah Collection or Photos.com, please contact Director of Marketing Katherine Wells: Katherine.wells@gettyimages.com

 

Thanks, New York Times!

Save the Village (every Tuesday) Last year the Steven Kasher Gallery in Chelsea put on an exhibition with the photography of Fred W. McDarrah, who documented the changing scene of Greenwich Village since the 1960s. Now, the spirit of that show has taken the form of this walking tour, which includes stops at the places McDarrah captured on film: locales like Washington Square Park and the Stonewall Inn. At 10 a.m.; the tour meets at Christopher Park, Stonewall Place, at Seventh Avenue, West Village, savethevillagetours.com.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/21/arts/spare-times-for-aug-21-27.html

Making Christopher Park a National Park

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Making Christopher Park a National Park

A campaign is underway to make a National Park out of Christopher Park, located across from the Stonewall Inn on Christopher Street. Go to savestonewall.org to learn more.

At .19 acres (according to http://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/christopher-park) it would not be the smallest National Park. That would be the Philadelphia house where Polish freedom fighter Thaddeus Kosciuszko lived, which clocks in at .02 acres. His name should be familiar to drivers who have spent hours crossing the short, potholed and badly designed bridge on the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway that bears his name, which crosses Newtown Creek.

As of June 2015, Christopher Park has a new informational sign posted by the city Parks Department, detailing the famous 1969 riots that mark the start of the modern day gay rights movement. The image on the sign was taken by... Fred W. McDarrah, making him part of the official New York City story of the gay rights movement. It is on the Save the Village tour

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