Viewing entries tagged
gay rights

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PRIDE!

George Segal sculpture in Christopher Park, Four Figures, draped in colors after the June 2016 Orlando nightclub attack. 

George Segal sculpture in Christopher Park, Four Figures, draped in colors after the June 2016 Orlando nightclub attack. 

June is Gay Pride Month!

   Once again, photos from the archive of the original Village Voice photographer Fred W. McDarrah are an important part of the occasion. 


   Rarely seen Gay Pride McPhotos will be incorporated into Save The Village: Walking Tours of the Photographs of Fred W. McDarrah, a series of Greenwich Village walking tours based on his classic photos. Book a tour here: http://www.savethevillagetours.com/

   McPhotos are part of AIDS at Home: The Art of Everyday Activism, which opens May 23 at the Museum of the City of New York.  http://www.mcny.org/exhibition/aids-home

   The interactive map just released by the NYC LGBT Historic Sites project features over a dozen exclusive McPhotos. https://www.nyclgbtsites.org/

   Scholars, researchers, filmmakers and historians rely on the McDarrah Archive as they know there is no more complete photo collection that documents the people, personalities, parades and protests of the modern Gay Rights movement in the United States.

  Learn more on a Save the Village tour this month!

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Warm Weather Walking

Preparing the selfie stick before last Saturday's tour.

Preparing the selfie stick before last Saturday's tour.

 Global warming as some advantages: no one is really ever that cold on a tour these days!

 Spring has sprung and tourgoers are marveling at how much things have changed, even from last season (the repeat visitors, that is).

 Mainly that so many more storefronts are vacant. It's sad.

 Come see it all for yourself on a Save the Village tour today!

 And remember the June tours are geared for Pride Month with new stops and photos.  

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June Tours Mark Gay Pride Month

This interpretive Stonewall sign in Christopher Park installed by the Parks dept. features a photo by Fred W. McDarrah (above).

The June tours will include some amazing, exclusive never-before-seen postcards of McDarrah photos of gay events and personalities to mark Pride Month.

No other walking tour even comes close.

Book a tour today

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Orlando mourned on Christopher St.

Putting on a shirt before going into the Stonewall Inn today, after leaving flowers in front. Photo © 2016 Estate of Fred W. McDarrah. All Rights Reserved.

Putting on a shirt before going into the Stonewall Inn today, after leaving flowers in front.
Photo © 2016 Estate of Fred W. McDarrah. All Rights Reserved.

  In 1969, the cops raided the Stonewall Inn. Today, 48 years later, they were there to protect it, in the wake of the massacre in Orlando.

  Laws and attitude have come a long way over the last few decades, but there is still obviously a long way to go.

  You can not legislate against hate, or stupidity. But you can educate and lead by example.
Look at all these photos. Think about what happened. Do what you can to help make sure it never happens again.

  The Save the Village tour stops at Stonewall. Now, unfortunately, there will be one more story to tell, about June 12, 2016, when thousands gathered there to share their sadness, grief and hope for a better world not only for the LGBT community, but for everyone.

  Go to the Save the Village Tours Facebook page to see amany more photos of the sad day.

  https://www.facebook.com/savethevillagewalkingtours/

Outside Stonewall today. Photo © 2016 Estate of Fred W. McDarrah. All Rights Reserved.

Outside Stonewall today.
Photo © 2016 Estate of Fred W. McDarrah. All Rights Reserved.

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Making the Invisible Visible: NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project

Andrew Dolkart, A Columbia professor and Director of the school's Historic Preservation Program, name checked Teddy McDarrah - grandson of the photographer we're here for - at an NYPL event tonight. See more photos on the Save The Village Tours Facebook page.

Andrew Dolkart, A Columbia professor and Director of the school's Historic Preservation Program, name checked Teddy McDarrah - grandson of the photographer we're here for - at an NYPL event tonight. See more photos on the Save The Village Tours Facebook page.

  Pretty solid event at the Celeste Auditorium at the big New York Public Library on 5th Avenue this evening.

  "Making the Invisible Visible: NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project" has the entirely worthy goal of making more gay-themed historic sites in New York City.

  There are only a handful nationwide, and some cities have more than New York does. We have so few you can use one hand to count them.

  Go here to learn more:  http://nyclgbtsites.org/ 

  And see some of the proposed (and the few existing) sites on a Save the Village Tour.

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All clean. In its own inimitable way.

The famous Stonewall Inn,  sans  scaffolding once again.

The famous Stonewall Inn, sans scaffolding once again.

  In addition to the sparkling exterior, a lot of the interior art - mainly pages of photos taken from the 1994 McDarrah opus "Gay Pride: Photos from Stonewall to Today" which marked the 25th anniversary of the uprising - have spiffy new frames.

  Go inside and check the place out. All are always welcome.

  And kudos to owner Kurt Kelly for his expert handling/balancing act of not only running a viable working business, but at the same preserving and honoring the bar's tradition, history, meaning and historical importance.

What is under the scaffolding?

New signs on the green plywood in front of the Stonewall Inn announce what is under the scaffolding.

New signs on the green plywood in front of the Stonewall Inn announce what is under the scaffolding.

Maybe it was hard for people to figure out where the world famous Stonewall Inn had disappeared to?

Regardless, two new signs went up the other day alerting passers by and anyone else what the business was under the scaffolding.

Not terribly unusual for signs to be on scaffolding, but this made us do a double take.  

It's official for Stonewall

City Council makes official what occurred back in June.

Serious: http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/stonewall-inn-offical-landmark-gay-rights-movement-article-1.2380701

Sarcastic: http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2015/10/stonewall-inn-officially-landmarked.html#

As we were saying...

Tour-goers photograph George Segal's "Four Figures" and the Park Dept. interpretive sign (with Fred W. McDarrah image) at Christopher Park, which lawmakers are now pushing for National Park status.  Stonewall is in background with the green scaffolding.

Tour-goers photograph George Segal's "Four Figures" and the Park Dept. interpretive sign (with Fred W. McDarrah image) at Christopher Park, which lawmakers are now pushing for National Park status.  Stonewall is in background with the green scaffolding.

As we reported a few weeks back (scroll down), there is a push to create a national park at Christopher Park to honor the 1969 Stonewall Riots.

Now the movement is getting bigger.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/21/nyregion/lawmakers-seek-national-park-in-honor-of-stonewall.html?ref=nyregion&_r=0  

Excellent. More plaques to go up for us to photograph! Nah. Seriously, federally protected status won't much change anything in the park itself, as the current owner, the City of New York, isn't about to do anything to fudge things up. But it could help in preserving the Stonewall façade, ensure funds from Washington D.C. to maintain the park and streets around it, and it adds another level of legitimacy and gravitas to the location.   

And it couldn't hurt with preserving other landmarked and non-landmarked but vitally important historic places in New York on the Save the Village walking tour route, and elsewhere.

New McDarrah prints available for first time

This may not be a typical blog post - it is more of a press release.  But since we wrote it, seems like fair use.

PHOTOS.COM by GETTY IMAGES SNAPS UP LEGENDARY VILLAGE VOICE PHOTOGRAPHER FRED W. McDARRAH 

New Prints of Classic Greenwich Village Images Available For First Time

Photos.com proudly announces the addition of the Fred W. McDarrah Collection.

Fred W. McDarrah was the most curious, knowledgeable, and indefatigable chronicler of the New York scene over the second half of the 20th century. 

His work brings a new and unique selection of images to the collected works of an already world class Photos.com lineup including Alfred Eisenstadt, Margaret Bourke-White and Ansel Adams.

McDarrah rose to prominence during his 50-year association with the Village Voice newspaper, the house organ of the post-war counterculture. The New York Times has described McDarrah as the "Bachrach of New York's Bohemia."

He photographed the artists, writers, musicians, and actors who frequented the bars, theaters, galleries, and cafes in Greenwich Village. He documented political rallies, museum openings, breaking news, feminism, experimental theater, the rock and folk music scenes, dance, and the civil rights and anti-war movements. In a style simple and direct McDarrah created street and studio portraits of luminaries, politicians and celebrities that were often definitive.

But his favorite subject may have been his beloved New York City; often roaming the city on his bicycle, he documented the streets, buildings, landmarks, parks, beaches, pushcarts, subways, architecture, landscapes, churches, signs, cobblestones, storefronts and rooftops.

McDarrah's photographs have been exhibited at numerous museums, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Wadsworth Atheneum and the Centre Georges Pompidou-Paris; and are in private and public collections including the National Portrait Gallery, the J. Paul Getty Museum, the New York Public Library, the Andy Warhol Museum, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

For The Fred W. McDarrah Collection, the editors at Photos.com have selected more than 200 of McDarrah’s most delightful and inspiring images, with an eye towards their ability to work as wall décor. Many of the images shown here are available to the consumer market for the very first time.

About Photos.com by Getty Images:

Built on Getty Images’ unrivaled archive and exclusive collections from a wide range of world-renowned photographers, Photos.com by Getty Images is a full service printing and framing e-commerce business.  Every image is available in four sizes and five framing options: paper, canvas, acrylic, birchwood & aluminum, and arrives at your doorstep framed and ready-to-hang.  With more than 250,000 images spanning current events and famous faces to world culture, contemporary concepts and iconic black-and-white photography, there’s something to inspire and complement every interior style.

Photos.com by Getty Images is not affiliated with the J. Paul Getty Trust or its operating programs including the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Getty Research Institute, the Getty Conservation Institute, and the Getty Foundation.

For more information about the Fred W. McDarrah Collection or Photos.com, please contact Director of Marketing Katherine Wells: Katherine.wells@gettyimages.com

 

Making Christopher Park a National Park

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Making Christopher Park a National Park

A campaign is underway to make a National Park out of Christopher Park, located across from the Stonewall Inn on Christopher Street. Go to savestonewall.org to learn more.

At .19 acres (according to http://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/christopher-park) it would not be the smallest National Park. That would be the Philadelphia house where Polish freedom fighter Thaddeus Kosciuszko lived, which clocks in at .02 acres. His name should be familiar to drivers who have spent hours crossing the short, potholed and badly designed bridge on the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway that bears his name, which crosses Newtown Creek.

As of June 2015, Christopher Park has a new informational sign posted by the city Parks Department, detailing the famous 1969 riots that mark the start of the modern day gay rights movement. The image on the sign was taken by... Fred W. McDarrah, making him part of the official New York City story of the gay rights movement. It is on the Save the Village tour

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