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gregory corso

Dylan and Beats tour announcement

Dylan Salutes, Christopher Park, Sheridan Square, January 22, 1965. Photo by Fred W. McDarrah.

Dylan Salutes, Christopher Park, Sheridan Square, January 22, 1965. Photo by Fred W. McDarrah.

This is the press release that went out the other day about the new tour:

Bob Dylan and the Beat Generation poets - Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, Peter Orlovsky, Gregory Corso and the rest - all were products of a postwar culture that lauded Eisenhower and the Military-Industrial complex, Father Knows Best, the John Birch Society and the KKK.

  In song and in verse, Dylan and the Beats rebelled against that way of life and became touchstones of a new generation.

  Fred W. McDarrah, the longtime Village Voice photographer and picture editor, was right there with his camera as it happened.  


  The worlds of Dylan and the Beat poets overlapped in many ways. The Beats and Bob tour will visit the coffee houses, clubs, and other venues (some remaining, some not) where the Beats made literary history. And when Dylan met Ginsberg in Ted Wilentz's apartment above the 8th St. Bookshop in 1963, the two began a lifelong friendship. Dylan was well familiar with the Beat poets when he left Minnesota for Greenwich Village in 1961. The tour stops at the MacDougal Street club were Dylan first performed, the bars he frequented and often performed at, and some of his Village homes, hangouts and hideouts.

  Every ticket on every tour includes a keepsake postcard packet of iconic McDarrah images and the tours go to the same locations to see how they have changed,  how they are the same, and to hear the stories behind the famous photos.

  The Beats and Bob tour is the second in a series of four Greenwich Village Walking Tours based on the photographs of McDarrah, including the ongoing Save The Village tour, and two tours starting later this fall, the East Village tour and the Artist’s World tour.

  Tickets are $25 (Adult) and $15 (Students, seniors, individuals with a valid library card, or a membership in a Historic Preservation Society, Group or Association) and every ticket includes a keepsake postcard packet.

   All tours are available for private bookings; custom or combination tours can be arranged. For tour schedules, to make reservations and for more information, go to SaveTheVillageTours.com.


  MEETS AT CORNER OF MACDOUGAL ALLEY AND MACDOUGAL STREET


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   The original Save the Village tour now joins the New York Knicks, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and dozens of all you can eat sushi joints, on Groupon.

  https://www.groupon.com/deals/save-the-village-tours

Happy in the House

Bob Dylan and Allen Ginsberg, among others, pose for a group portrait by Fred W. McDarrah at a recording session, Record Plant studio, New York, November 13, 1971. Pictured are, from left, David Amram, Dylan, Happy Traum, Gregory Corso, Peter Orlovsky (kneeling, fore), Denise Mercedes, Allen Ginsberg, Sadi Kazi, John Sholle, Arthur Russell, and Ed Sanders.

Bob Dylan and Allen Ginsberg, among others, pose for a group portrait by Fred W. McDarrah at a recording session, Record Plant studio, New York, November 13, 1971. Pictured are, from left, David Amram, Dylan, Happy Traum, Gregory Corso, Peter Orlovsky (kneeling, fore), Denise Mercedes, Allen Ginsberg, Sadi Kazi, John Sholle, Arthur Russell, and Ed Sanders.

  The big Folk City show at the Museum of the City of New York has had a handful of concerts to go along with the fabulous exhibit (of lyrics, instruments, maps, recordings, albums, clothing, memorabilia and of course photos by Fred W. McDarrah).

  We ran into one of the above photographed musicians the other night at one of the MCNY concerts. Not Bob Dylan, but Happy Traum.

  Happy is most famously known as one half of Happy and Artie, a duo he began with his brother. They released three albums, Happy and Artie Traum (1970, Capitol), Double Back (1971, Capitol) and Hard Times In The Country (1975, Rounder). He is a folk legend, having first appeared on record at a historic session in 1962 when a group including Phil Ochs, Pete Seeger and Dylan gathered in the Folkways Records studio to record an album called Broadside Ballads, Vol. 1. With his group, The New World Singers, Traum cut the first recoded version of Blowin' in the Wind and sang a duet with Dylan, who performed under the pseudonym Blind Boy Grunt, on his anti-war Let Me Die in My Footsteps.

  On this night at MCNY the performers were The Chapin Sisters and Eric Andersen. The sisters are at best marginally talented and coast along on the memories fans have of the short but brilliant career of their uncle Harry, who died in an accident on the Long Island Expressway in 1981.   

Anderen was accompanied by Michele Gazich on violin and viola, Inge Andersen on harmonies, and Steve Addabbo on electric guitar

Anderen was accompanied by Michele Gazich on violin and viola, Inge Andersen on harmonies, and Steve Addabbo on electric guitar

  Anderson is a genuine talent who performed chestnuts such as Violets of Dawn and Come to My Bedside and the civil rights song Thirsty Boots. He has over the years played with most of the above photographed group and has released about 30 albums. He now lives in Europe where there is a more vibrant folk scene.   

  He spoke between songs about his experiences singing on MacDougal Street and at the Gaslight, one of the stops on the Save the Village: The Beats and Bob (Dylan) tour.  

Andersen came out to meet fans after the performance.

Andersen came out to meet fans after the performance.

Andersen signing autographs.

Andersen signing autographs.