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save the village

Old/New Across from Artist's Club

Above: A row of art galleries on E. 10th Street between 3rd and 4th Avenues, May 25, 1960. Below, same location in March 2016. Photos © Estate of Fred W. McDarrah

Above: A row of art galleries on E. 10th Street between 3rd and 4th Avenues, May 25, 1960. Below, same location in March 2016. Photos © Estate of Fred W. McDarrah

10thSt.JPG

  That things ain't what they used to be is a song that most people are perhaps bored of hearing.

  But it is an important song.

  The point of all the Save the Village tours is that New York - and everywhere else - needs to learn to strike a balance between progress and preservation. You be the judge: Which version of East 10th St. is preferable? One has decorative stoops, big glass windowed businesses that seem inviting and some personality.

  The other version has uniform brick walls.

  The weather is turning and it is a great time to schedule a walking tour where you can see first hand the changes to various streets and buildings and shake off those winter blahs.

 

Very Full-Phil-ing, the people you run into

Chuck Close, Phil/Watercolor, 1977. The original is about 6 feet by 6 feet. Watercolor and acrylic on paper. © Chuck Close, via PaceWildenstein, New York. Photo by Ellen Labenski.

Chuck Close, Phil/Watercolor, 1977. The original is about 6 feet by 6 feet. Watercolor and acrylic on paper. © Chuck Close, via PaceWildenstein, New York. Photo by Ellen Labenski.

  One sees a lot of famous faces in the Village. As a former gossip columnist who still keeps up on things and looks at a lot of photos, I still miss plenty, of course.

  At dinner recently I saw Alan Cumming - at a low end red sauce joint in the East Village. Another dinner had Tony Danza one table away (alas, no Alyssa Milano!).

  Lily Tomlin (!) walked up to me on Prince St. and asked for directions. Kim and Kayne have an apartment right across the street from me (can't they afford better!?).

  Bob Dylan is no stranger to my elevator. No necessarily recently, but an old pal of his still does live upstairs.

  As a kid, I'd play with Naomi Wolf, Robert Downey Jr. and Matthew Broderick in Washington Square Park.

  David Byrne, Steve van Zandt, Susan Sarandon, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Lou Reed and Philip Seymour Hoffman (before they both died): always out and about.

  Though really, who cares. Celebrities are people too. Generally.

  But today I stopped, stared, chatted, and asked to take a photo of one. On 14th St., just off the Save the Village tour route, while heading from the Greenmarket to the gym, I was passing the Guitar Center music emporium and saw the legendary minimalist composer Philip Glass.

  OK, not Sean Lennon or Julia Roberts or Sofia Coppola or Alec Baldwin (all Village denizens).

  This guy, however, is better: one of the most influential music makers of the late 20th century. He has been part of the downtown scene since about 1967. Compositions like The Photographer and Einstein on the Beach should be familiar to people, and he has composed everything from operas to Academy Award nominated movie scores and other orchestral works. 

  Polite too, to a jackass who had just stopped him on the street. Last time I had bumped into him was at Tower Records, I gushed, when I introduced him to my son, and showed the kid Glass' records in the rack. He said he remembered, as "really, I don't get recognized very often." But he may have just been being polite. And I had interviewed him in the distant past.

  Anyway, I let him flee, which he did, into the Guitar Center. After publishing his memoir, Words Without Music, earlier this year, he's back to making music.

  Go listen to it.    

Philip Glass on 14th St., December 9, 2015.

Philip Glass on 14th St., December 9, 2015.

  

BLONDE ON WHERE?

Album cover photo by Daniel Kramer. Taken in front of Albert Grossman's former residence at 4 Gramercy Park West. Overlay with album cover from PopSpotsNYC.com.

Album cover photo by Daniel Kramer. Taken in front of Albert Grossman's former residence at 4 Gramercy Park West. Overlay with album cover from PopSpotsNYC.com.

The reason the Internet exists is so people like my friend Bob Egan can teach us.

He runs the marvelous popspotsnyc.com, which explores local locales where the lost art of album covers is dissected.

Lou Reed, Billy Joel, the Stones, the Dead, Bruce, the Ramones, KISS, Blondie, Woody Guthrie, and other local (and not so local) bands used NYC as the set for their cover shoots. And Bob, like a Law & Order detective, or a good Woodward and Bernstein disciple, takes the best of them and reports on his delightfully exhaustive journeys to find the EXACT spots the band was photographed.      

His Highway 61 journey is here:

http://www.popspotsnyc.com/highway61revisited/index.html

Gramercy Park is a bit off from the route of our new The Beats and Bob (Dylan) tour, but the tour does go by the Jones St. locale of the Freewheelin' Bob Dylan cover photo. And lots of other Dylan hangouts.

Fred W. McDarrah's photo contemporary (and our old college professor) John Cohen and Cohen's early film footage of Dylan is here:

http://www.popspotsnyc.com/john_cohen_roof/

But really, go to the web site and read every word, and look at every photo. It is not quite a substitute for going on a good invigorating walking tour, but it is endlessly fascinating both from its reporting, the history and how the songs on the records he discusses still echo in one's head.

He is still on a mission - to find where the Blonde on Blonde cover was shot. Any ideas? Let him know.  

 

Grossman's former digs, December 2015.  

Grossman's former digs, December 2015.  

Happy in the House

Bob Dylan and Allen Ginsberg, among others, pose for a group portrait by Fred W. McDarrah at a recording session, Record Plant studio, New York, November 13, 1971. Pictured are, from left, David Amram, Dylan, Happy Traum, Gregory Corso, Peter Orlovsky (kneeling, fore), Denise Mercedes, Allen Ginsberg, Sadi Kazi, John Sholle, Arthur Russell, and Ed Sanders.

Bob Dylan and Allen Ginsberg, among others, pose for a group portrait by Fred W. McDarrah at a recording session, Record Plant studio, New York, November 13, 1971. Pictured are, from left, David Amram, Dylan, Happy Traum, Gregory Corso, Peter Orlovsky (kneeling, fore), Denise Mercedes, Allen Ginsberg, Sadi Kazi, John Sholle, Arthur Russell, and Ed Sanders.

  The big Folk City show at the Museum of the City of New York has had a handful of concerts to go along with the fabulous exhibit (of lyrics, instruments, maps, recordings, albums, clothing, memorabilia and of course photos by Fred W. McDarrah).

  We ran into one of the above photographed musicians the other night at one of the MCNY concerts. Not Bob Dylan, but Happy Traum.

  Happy is most famously known as one half of Happy and Artie, a duo he began with his brother. They released three albums, Happy and Artie Traum (1970, Capitol), Double Back (1971, Capitol) and Hard Times In The Country (1975, Rounder). He is a folk legend, having first appeared on record at a historic session in 1962 when a group including Phil Ochs, Pete Seeger and Dylan gathered in the Folkways Records studio to record an album called Broadside Ballads, Vol. 1. With his group, The New World Singers, Traum cut the first recoded version of Blowin' in the Wind and sang a duet with Dylan, who performed under the pseudonym Blind Boy Grunt, on his anti-war Let Me Die in My Footsteps.

  On this night at MCNY the performers were The Chapin Sisters and Eric Andersen. The sisters are at best marginally talented and coast along on the memories fans have of the short but brilliant career of their uncle Harry, who died in an accident on the Long Island Expressway in 1981.   

Anderen was accompanied by Michele Gazich on violin and viola, Inge Andersen on harmonies, and Steve Addabbo on electric guitar

Anderen was accompanied by Michele Gazich on violin and viola, Inge Andersen on harmonies, and Steve Addabbo on electric guitar

  Anderson is a genuine talent who performed chestnuts such as Violets of Dawn and Come to My Bedside and the civil rights song Thirsty Boots. He has over the years played with most of the above photographed group and has released about 30 albums. He now lives in Europe where there is a more vibrant folk scene.   

  He spoke between songs about his experiences singing on MacDougal Street and at the Gaslight, one of the stops on the Save the Village: The Beats and Bob (Dylan) tour.  

Andersen came out to meet fans after the performance.

Andersen came out to meet fans after the performance.

Andersen signing autographs.

Andersen signing autographs.

St. Marks is the Place

Adam Horovitz (R) and wife Kathleen Hanna at book party for new book chronicling history of St. Mark's Place

Adam Horovitz (R) and wife Kathleen Hanna at book party for new book chronicling history of St. Mark's Place

Cover of "St. Mark's Is Dead," by Ada Calhoun

Cover of "St. Mark's Is Dead," by Ada Calhoun

The East Village/Save the Village tour, starting this month, all of a sudden has a news peg. Hot new book is out this week about St. Mark's Place. Was excerpted in the New Yorker this week (with the requisite Fred W. McDarrah photo of St. Marks Place denizens in the 1960s http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/the-many-lives-of-st-marks-place). Author Ada Calhoun also had an OpEd piece in the Sunday Times. And she is on the cover of the Village Voice. And...

Of course the book has plenty of McDarrah photos. One that is on this web site - but not in the book - was featured by Calhoun at an event at Cooper Union's Great Hall Monday night. The photo is of Jerry Rubin waving a machine gun on St. Mark's Place.

Sad to say I doubt a lot of the people at tonight's event knew who Jerry Rubin was. There were a lot of old timers there - store owners, junkies, musicians, characters, etc. But for better or (I say) worse, names like Jerry Rubin, the Village Voice or Beat poets don't resonate as much in today's youth culture as I think they should.

Ada Calhoun on the Cooper Union Great Hall stage with a Fred W. McDarrah image of Jerry Rubin on St. Mark's Place on the screen behind her.

Ada Calhoun on the Cooper Union Great Hall stage with a Fred W. McDarrah image of Jerry Rubin on St. Mark's Place on the screen behind her.

(Case in point: I had a cracked tooth pulled the other day. The man with the pliers was a younger guy from the San Francisco Bay area. We chatted about the usual things. Seems he had never heard of the City Lights bookstore WHICH IS IN SAN FRANCISCO, the Beat Generation literary movement or any of its poets, or the Village Voice newspaper. Yes he was a dentist. But a basic cultural education/background just isn't part of the social curriculum anymore it often seems.)

Anyway, Calhoun gave a delightfully brief and funny compact history of the street, then gave way to a band made up of some of her friends, including Beastie Boy Adam Horovitz and his wife Kathleen Hanna and downtown performers like Murray Hill and Bridget Everett, the bawdy cabaret singer.

They did some Ramones songs, King Missile's classic, "Detachable Penis"  and Lydia Lunch's "Saint Marks Place." And some others I did not recognize.

Her young son Oliver joined the band briefly and she pointed out a lot of her friends and other people in the audience that helped her on the making of the book, including her dad, noted art critic Peter Schjeldahl. And Gloria S. McDarrah, who patiently went thru 50 years of St. Mark's Place photos last year for Calhoun to select from.

Anyway, but the book. Read it. And see it come to life by going on the East Village/Save the Village tour.

The St. Mark's Zeroes.

The St. Mark's Zeroes.

Calhoun and son Oliver with her parents right behind her

Calhoun and son Oliver with her parents right behind her

Dance fever

A plaque outside 66 Fifth Avenue, where Martha Graham established her dance company in 1926.

A plaque outside 66 Fifth Avenue, where Martha Graham established her dance company in 1926.

Another Village plaque honoring a world class individual, dancer and choreographer who had world class skills and left an incredibly lasting legacy.

It has been said that Martha Graham's influence on dance is comparable to the influence Picasso had on the modern visual arts, or that Babe Ruth had on baseball, Stravinsky on music, Frank Lloyd Wright on architecture, Julia Child on cooking. I'd add that Graham was in the class of the Ramones or the Velvet Underground and their impact on the bands that followed them. All towering giants in their field. 

Graham was the first dancer to perform at the White House and to receive the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian award.

Now, thousands of people a day pass through or by the entrance to the Parsons School of Design with nary a glance or a thought of the spot's history. 

The Save the Village Greenwich Village walking tour could just go from plaque to plaque, it sometimes seems. The amazing thing is that we keep noticing new ones, on buildings that we have walked past for decades. Such as this one.  

The entrance to 66 Fifth Ave. The Graham plaque is on the right, facing the building.

The entrance to 66 Fifth Ave. The Graham plaque is on the right, facing the building.

Old/New

Before: The corner of 8th St. and MacDougal in front of the famous 8th St. Bookshop. (Pictured is peace activist David McReynolds delivering a "Ban The Bomb" speech on September 18, 1960.  

Before: The corner of 8th St. and MacDougal in front of the famous 8th St. Bookshop. (Pictured is peace activist David McReynolds delivering a "Ban The Bomb" speech on September 18, 1960.  

After: The same corner, now a chain coffee spot, in September 2015. People came to the Village for, among other things, independent bookstores. Save the Village or it will be nothing BUT awful chain stores.

After: The same corner, now a chain coffee spot, in September 2015. People came to the Village for, among other things, independent bookstores. Save the Village or it will be nothing BUT awful chain stores.

How it was and what it now is: The Save the Village tours highlight lowlights like this. Only YOU can prevent forest fires, as Smokey the Bear used to say. Well, only YOU can prevent future abominations such as this one, where the nerve center of a literary generation morphs into a cookie cutter coffee joint that could easily be found in any strip mall in America.  

Thanks, New York Times!

Save the Village (every Tuesday) Last year the Steven Kasher Gallery in Chelsea put on an exhibition with the photography of Fred W. McDarrah, who documented the changing scene of Greenwich Village since the 1960s. Now, the spirit of that show has taken the form of this walking tour, which includes stops at the places McDarrah captured on film: locales like Washington Square Park and the Stonewall Inn. At 10 a.m.; the tour meets at Christopher Park, Stonewall Place, at Seventh Avenue, West Village, savethevillagetours.com.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/21/arts/spare-times-for-aug-21-27.html

All Dylan Tour?

116 MacDougal Street, former home of the Gaslight Cafe.

116 MacDougal Street, former home of the Gaslight Cafe.

The death this week of Bob Johnston, who produced "Blonde on Blonde" and "Highway 61 Revisited" for Bob Dylan (plus classic albums for Johnny Cash, Leonard Cohen and many others) got us thinking about adding another tour to the Save The Village lineup - an all Bob Dylan tour.

Doing research for the Save The Village tours, we went on some other local tours - both walking and on those ubiquitous double decker buses - to see what was good, bad and ugly.

The saddest was at the end of one tour when a woman from Australia turned to me and said, "Mate... How can these people offer a Greenwich Village tour and not even mention Bob Dylan?! That is why I came on the tour!"

Agreed.

I know who John Dos Passos, ee cummings and Dashiell Hammet were, can point to the corner where the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire took place and know where on Grove St. that Thomas Paine wrote "Common Sense." And some people do come on tours for old stuff. But people also want to see places that they can relate to, from their own memories or experiences. That is why we point out where on West 10th St. Julia Roberts has an apartment. (Across from Edward Albee's old place).   

It would not be too hard to put together an All Bob Tour, encompassing where he lived, worked, played, visited, shopped... all below 14th St. (Maybe we'd stretch it up to Irving Place where one of his business managers we know had an office.)

161 W.  4th St., where Dylan first rented an apartment - a top floor studio facing the back.

161 W.  4th St., where Dylan first rented an apartment - a top floor studio facing the back.

The tour would likely include places he performed including just on MacDougal Street: The Folklore Center, Cafe Wha? (see photo), Gerde's Folk City, the Gaslight Cafe and Kettle of Fish; the Theatre de Lys on Christopher Street which was a favorite spot; also the Cedar Tavern on University Place, The White Horse on Hudson St., The Bitter End and the Village Gate (both on Bleecker Street) or he'd be in Washington Square Park listening to music on a Sunday afternoon (as famously captured in a McDarrah photograph elsewhere on this site); or places he lived or crashed such as 161 West 4th St. (see photo) , 94 MacDougal St. (see photo), the former Hotel Earle or One Sheridan Square.

And Fred W. McDarrah did photograph most of these places.

Hmmm...

94 MacDougal St., which Dylan owned in the 1970s. 

94 MacDougal St., which Dylan owned in the 1970s. 

A piece of Whitney History

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A piece of Whitney History

The scaffolding is finally off the New York Studio School at 8-12 West 8th St., a stop on the Save the Village tour. The building was the original home of the Whitney Museum, which opened at that location in 1931. The museum came into being when the Metropolitan Museum of Art rejected Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney’s gift of over 500 modern paintings. So she opened up her own museum. It is now regarded as one of the finest on the planet and is housed in a magnificent new space on Gansevoort Street after years on the Upper East Side. It left 8th St. in 1954.

Anyway, the point here is that for the first time in decades, the carved stone name of the museum is visible above the main doorway to the building.  

Or at least it will be temporarily. The school will cover it up again soon with its own signage.

But we snapped a photo of the uncovered doorway. It looks fantastic. You'd think the school would want to keep it visible; it is an extraordinary and unique link to art history. Can't they put their name off to the side, or above it. Or both if they think someone will mistake it for the Whitney Museum.

It remains impossible to fathom why everyone doesn't think like we do. Such a mystery.

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Making Christopher Park a National Park

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Making Christopher Park a National Park

A campaign is underway to make a National Park out of Christopher Park, located across from the Stonewall Inn on Christopher Street. Go to savestonewall.org to learn more.

At .19 acres (according to http://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/christopher-park) it would not be the smallest National Park. That would be the Philadelphia house where Polish freedom fighter Thaddeus Kosciuszko lived, which clocks in at .02 acres. His name should be familiar to drivers who have spent hours crossing the short, potholed and badly designed bridge on the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway that bears his name, which crosses Newtown Creek.

As of June 2015, Christopher Park has a new informational sign posted by the city Parks Department, detailing the famous 1969 riots that mark the start of the modern day gay rights movement. The image on the sign was taken by... Fred W. McDarrah, making him part of the official New York City story of the gay rights movement. It is on the Save the Village tour

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Preserve the Artists Club!

Preserve the Artists Club!

 Fred W. McDarrah images are everywhere. Here are two that are part of the ongoing Activism show at the Museum of the City of New York.

And bang the drum slowly for one of the key locales of the Artists walking tour, and the New York School and Abstract Expressionist movement: the famous Artists Club.

According to our friends at EVGrieve, condos are in the works for the corner of 10th St. and 4th Ave., the corner that hosted the greatest incarnation of the famous gathering spot for artists.  http://evgrieve.com/2015/07/10-stories-of-condos-in-works-for-long.html

You can read more about The Club in the Artists Tour web page.

Willem deKooning, the older white haired fellow on the background photo of the Tours page (on the stoop of the New York Hotel Employment Agency) lived and worked down the block from the club at 88 East 10th in the early 1950s. He had moved from just around the corner at 85 Fourth Avenue. By 1960 he had sold a few pictures and rented a studio space at 831 Broadway (located across the street and just south of the Regal 14 Union Square cinema; an apartment that was later carved out of deKooning's space recently rented for $8900 per month). In 1963, DeKooning decamped for Springs, a budding artist's community in East Hampton, where he lived and work until he died in 1997.

SAVE THE VILLAGE!

SAVE THE VILLAGE!

Demolishers dismantle an artist's studio, the facade of which is painted with the slogans 'Save the Village' and 'Wake Up Mr. Mayor!' New York, New York, May 16, 1960. Photo by Fred W. McDarrah.

Demolishers dismantle an artist's studio, the facade of which is painted with the slogans 'Save the Village' and 'Wake Up Mr. Mayor!' New York, New York, May 16, 1960. Photo by Fred W. McDarrah.

Welcome to the Save the Village Tours blog.

In addition to talking about the tours, posting photos of tours and the people on them and the sights that are seen, we will do something else, too. 

We'll keep track best we can of downtown changes that we feel, well, may be not so good. We're all about supporting the folks that are SAVING what is left (see: Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, gvshp.org/) and doing whatever little bit we can to keep Greenwich Village what is was, and is. With Fred W. McDarrah's photos one can see clearly what we are losing.  

It is not a new crusade. The McDarrah image on the Home page that has "Save The Village... Wake Up Mr. Mayor" is from 1960, and is referring to Mayor Robert F. Wagner. Similar slogans probably first appeared on the walls of the caves at Lascaux. 

But it is a crusade where this time, the light at the end of the tunnel may be a freight train coming to run us over. One conductor is NYU, which is doing its best to destroy the neighborhood that gives the school part of its appeal. Another conductor is Rudin Management, which replaced St. Vincent's, the only hospital in the Village, with more million dollar apartments. Another conductor is the husband and wife team of Oscar Proust and Colleen Goujjane who were cited last week for without anyone's knowledge or permission destroying part of the doorway to their landmark 1834 carriage house (first owner: Aaron Burr) which is now the restaurant One of By Land Two if By Sea. 

Not to single out the folks above. There are many, many, many, many greedy evil demon landlords, developers and real estate professionals to be stopped. Calling them out on their activities, and highlighting what is being lost, is important.         

Won't try to replicate the general brilliance of EVgrieve.com, easily the city's leading news, entertainment and lifestyle blog. It focuses on life below 14th St and east of Broadway. And we'll be more narrow in focus than vanishingnewyork.blogspot.com, which accurately and amusingly calls itself, "A bitterly nostalgic look at a city in the process of going extinct."

Instead, we'll focus our musings best we can on the ground the tours and the photos cover, as well as note places where McDarrah photos are currently being displayed, either in galleries and museums, or newspapers and magazines, or online.

As of today, July 16, 2015, here is a current list of institutions that have McDarrah on the walls:     

 

DOMESTIC:

 

YOKO ONO: ONE WOMAN SHOW, 1960 – 1971

WITH NEVER BEFORE SEEN MCDARRAH PHOTOS OF ONO AND HER WORK FROM THE 1960S

MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

11 WEST 53RD STREET

NEW YORK, NY 10019

ON EXHIBIT UNTIL SEPTEMBER 17, 2015

 

ARTIST TO ARTIST 

PORTRAITS OF ARTISTS BY HENRI CARTIER-BRESSON, HOLLIS FRAMPTON AND FRED W. MCDARRAH

ALBRIGHT-KNOX ART GALLERY

1285 ELMWOOD AVENUE
BUFFALO, NEW YORK - NY 14222

ON EXHIBIT UNTIL NOVEMBER 8, 2015

HTTP://WWW.ALBRIGHTKNOX.ORG/EXHIBITIONS/EXHIBITION:07-11-2015-PHOTOGRAPHS-OF-ARTISTS-FROM-THE-COLLECTION-OF-THE-ALBRIGHT-KNOX/

 

THE YOUNG LORDS IN NEW YORK   

FEATURING MCDARRAH  PHOTOS IN THE FIRST MUSEUM SURVEY TO EXAMINE THE RADICAL SOCIAL GROUP FOUNDED BY PUERTO RICAN YOUTH IN THE 1960S.  

THE BRONX MUSEUM OF THE ARTS

1040 GRAND CONCOURSE

BRONX, NY  10456

ON EXHIBIT UNTIL SEPTEMBER 13, 2015

http://www.bronxmuseum.org/exhibitions/presente-the-young-lords-in-new-York

 

MUSEUM OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK   

INCLUDING MCDARRAH  PHOTOS IN AN UNPRECEDENTED THREE SEPARATE EXHIBITIONS

MUSEUM OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK

1220 FIFTH AVE.

NEW YORK, NY 10029

1) FOLK CITY

ON EXHIBIT UNTIL NOVEMBER 29, 2015

2) SAVING PLACE 50 YEARS OF NYC LANDMARKS

ON EXHIBIT UNTIL SEPTEMBER 13, 2015

3) ACTIVIST NEW YORK

ONGOING EXHIBIT  

http://www.mcny.org/exhibitions/current

 

INTERNATIONAL:

 

WARHOL UNDERGROUND

WITH 25 CLASSIC MCDARRAH IMAGES OF ANDY AND THE FACTORY SCENE

CENTRE POMPIDOU-METZ

1 PARVIS DES DROITS DE L'HOMME, 57020. METZ, FRANCE

ON EXHIBIT UNTIL NOVEMBER 23, 2015

CENTREPOMPIDOU-METZ.FR/WARHOL-UNDERGROUND

 

MILAN TRIENNIAL

RARELY SEEN FRED W. MCDARRAH PHOTOS; ART, ARTISTS AND FOOD IS THE EXHIBITON THEME

TRIENNALE DESIGN MUSEUM

VIALE ALEMAGNA, 6, 20121. MILAN, ITALY

ON EXHIBIT UNTIL NOVEMBER 1, 2015

EXPO2015.ORG/EN/THE-THEMATIC-AREA-OF-ARTS---FOODS-IS-PRESENTED-AT-MILAN-S-TRIENNALE

 

LOUISE BOURGEOIS: I HAVE BEEN TO HELL AND BACK

NEVER BEFORE EXHIBITED MCDARRAH IMAGES OF BOURGEOIS

MUSEO PICASSO, MALAGA, SPAIN

ON EXHIBIT  UNTIL SEPT 27, 2015

HTTP://WWW.MUSEOPICASSOMALAGA.ORG/EN/MUSEO-PICASSO-MALAGA-PRESENTS-THE-EXHIBITION-LOUISE-BOURGEOIS-I-HAVE-BEEN-TO-HELL-AND-BACK

MODERNA MUSEET, STOCKHOLM, SWEDEN  

ON EXHIBIT  FEB 14 TO MAY 17, 2015

 

Darn that is an impressive list!

And THREE shows at the Museum of the City of New York at once? That is unheard of. 

The point is that there is a tremendous demand for photos (and the memories?) of a Greenwich Village fast fading. That is why you are reading, right?