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Presidential

  President John Tyler was 54; his bride, born on an island bearing her name off the east end of Long Island, was 24.

  It was a secret engagement and marriage, which took place on 5th Avenue and 10th Street in Greenwich Village.

  Another fun fact you learn on a Save the Village tour.

Church of the Ascension, 10th Street and 5th Avenue.  Gardiner lived a short walk away, at LaGrange Terrace - now known as Lafayette Street, on Colonnade Row, where John Jacob Astor also resided.

Church of the Ascension, 10th Street and 5th Avenue.  Gardiner lived a short walk away, at LaGrange Terrace - now known as Lafayette Street, on Colonnade Row, where John Jacob Astor also resided.

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Famous faces

 Newland Archer, out of character

 Newland Archer, out of character

  A Save the Village tour-goer started talking to a passing fellow as he waited for The Beats and Bob Dylan tour to start on Tuesday, near the corner of MacDougal Alley and MacDougal Street. Finally the tour-goer said to the fellow, "You look an awful lot like Daniel Day-Lewis." Seems it was.

  Lewis was heading to Washington Square Park to enjoy the warm afternoon, where the tour group passed him as he lazed on a bench. Lewis nodded hello, and the group continued on its way.

  He is often seen out and about downtown. He and his wife, filmmaker Rebecca Miller (progeny of playwright Arthur Miller and Magnum photographer Inge Morath) live on West 10th St., a few blocks from Miller's college roommate, feminist author Naomi Wolf.

  Twice lately the tour crossed paths with croc-clad Babbo chef Mario Battali, tapped by the Obamas to cater their last state dinner.

  Just part of the fabric of the greatest neighborhood on earth.

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Take A Tour Today!

In the wake of the Nobel Prize announcement this week, it may be a good time to consider this: "Save the Village: Walking Tours of the Photographs of Fred W. McDarrah - The Beats and Bob Dylan."

This is the ONLY regularly scheduled Dylan-themed walking tour in New York. It runs every Tuesday at 2 pm, or privately by appointment

For each of the four Save the Village tours, walkers get a keepsake multi-postcard set of classic images by Fred W. McDarrah, the first photographer for the Village Voice. The tours go to the same locations as where the photos were taken, to see how things have changed, how they are the same and to hear the stories behind the famous photos.

Tickets and info are here: http://www.savethevillagetours.com/

See you there!

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Tangled up in Admiration

  Congratulations to the winner of the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature, Bob Dylan.

  Here is a vintage Fred W. McDarrah image of Bob, standing in Sheridan Square, outside the offices of the Village Voice, on January 22, 1965.

  The Save the Village: The Beats and Bob Dylan tour goes by this locale, and features several classic Dylan photos. 

  Sign up for a tour today!

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Old/New

Looking east on 8th St. from Sixth Ave., 1950 and today.

Walk along the historic street on a Save the Village tour. (Photo by Fred W. McDarrah/Getty Images)

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Folks Who Work to Save the Village

Andrew Berman, Executive Director of the GVSHP, addressing supporters.

Andrew Berman, Executive Director of the GVSHP, addressing supporters.

  The people who do the REAL work in Saving the Village were out having a well deserved nice time Thursday night.

  Over 100 trustees, top donors and supporters and the staff of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation were feted Thursday night by the family that owns Murray's Cheese at their minimalist West Village mini-mansion.

  The big news was that GVSHP director Andrew Berman revealed that the expansion of the South Village Historic District will become reality.

  Check out their website to learn more about the battle to help get designation for the swath of real estate below Houston St. and east of Sixth Ave. 

http://www.gvshp.org/_gvshp/preservation/south_village/south_village-main.htm

  Berman and his staff (Sarah Bean Apmann, Director of Research & Preservation; Harry Bubbins, East Village & Special Projects Director; Chelsea J. Dowell, Director of Communications and Programming; Matthew Morowitz Program and Administrative Associate; Sam Moskowitz, Director of Operations; and Lannyl Stephens, Director of Development and Special Events) are the hardest working group of its kind anywhere, their achievements are noticeable, real and breathtakingly important and if your balance sheet allows, you should make a (tax deductible!) contribution to this organization if you care about saving the Village.

 

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Remembering.

A remarkable number of photos taken by Fred W. McDarrah had the Twin Towers in the background.

McDarrah also documented the area in the 1960s, especially Radio Row, as it was being demolished to make way for the new construction.

Marty Scorsese was a graduation speaker at the May 14, 1992 ceremony in Washington Square Park, pictured here. (Photo by Fred W. McDarrah/Getty Images)

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Voice view

22 Greenwich Avenue, 2016

22 Greenwich Avenue, 2016

OLD/NEW: The first offices of the Village Voice newspaper, 22 Greenwich Avenue, August 10, 1960.

And the same location today.

The office was later to move to Sheridan Square, then 80 University Place, 842 Broadway, Cooper Square and is now on the 21st floor of a Maiden Lane office tower.

It's another fascinating stop on the Save the Village tour.

22 Greenwich Ave., August 10, 1960.  (Photo by Fred W. McDarrah/Getty Images).

22 Greenwich Ave., August 10, 1960.  (Photo by Fred W. McDarrah/Getty Images).

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Sad anniversary

The 10-story Asch Building,  site of the deadliest industrial disaster in the history of New York City. 

The 10-story Asch Building,  site of the deadliest industrial disaster in the history of New York City. 

To mark Labor Day, we wandered a bit off the path of the tours (going two blocks east of Washington Square Park, on the northwest corner of Greene Street and Washington Place) to the site of 1911's Triangle Shirtwaist fire.

The blaze took 146 lives, most of them young female garment center workers. The workers were locked into their workplace and many jumped from ten floors up to try and escape the flames.

It remains the city's deadliest industrial accident and led to changes in the fire codes, factory safety and spurred the growth of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union.

The building is both a national and a city landmark with three separate plaques marking the tragedy.

One of the three plaques on the building.

One of the three plaques on the building.

One of the three plaques on the building.

One of the three plaques on the building.

One of the three plaques on the building.

One of the three plaques on the building.

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Everyone loves Bob

Janis Joplin was one of the earliest to decorate her home with a Fred W. McDarrah photograph.

Here she is in a photo taken by Jim Marshall in her apartment at 122 Lyon Street in San Francisco, California, 1968.

A Personality Poster of 'Bob Dylan Saluting' taken by Fred W. McDarrah is prominently displayed.

Several already iconic McDarrah 1960s images were part of the series, including shots of Allen Ginsberg and Timothy Leary.

Be like Janis and order your own McDarrah print today: http://www.photos.com/prints/photographers/fred-w-mcdarrah

Or get your own postcard image of the iconic Dylan photo on a Save the Village tour!

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A tree grows in Manhattan. Anger grows around it.

Addie Tomei at her front door; the tree is on the right of the frame, abutting her staircase.

Addie Tomei at her front door; the tree is on the right of the frame, abutting her staircase.

  The great Pete Hamill once shoo'd us out of the office on a particularly slow news day.

  "You're never going to come up with a story sitting at your desk and eating potato chips" (we were eating a bag of rippled Lays at the time), Hamill gently scolded, urging us to wander the streets if there was nothing on the agenda.

  Out we went. Don't recall if I ended up with a good story that day. But the lesson has stayed with me.

  We still hit the street from time-to-time. It usually pays off.

  The other day we were wandering along West 13th St., having decided to go take a look at the tree in Sean Lennon's yard that was encroaching on his neighbors, Marisa Tomei's parents, Gary and Addie. The tree is the focus of a long running lawsuit (http://ny.curbed.com/2016/7/1/12078030/lennon-tomei-lawsuit-greenwich-village-tree) and I decided to go and take a look.

   What a fabulous New York story, right? Yoko Ono and John Lennon's son, neighbor to he parents of the beloved Brooklyn product and Academy Award-winning actress - suing over a tree?

   So as we're standing there looking at the tree and how it is growing onto the next door property, who walks up carrying some grocery bags but... Marisa Tomei's mom. A spittin' image of her daughter. Or vice versa, I guess.

  She is suspicious of the stranger on her stoop, but after talking, Addie Tomei realizes I am more or less harmless. She reviews with me the history of the situation, offers some generally positive remarks about her famous neighbor, and laments how it has disintegrated into a public brouhaha.

  I thank her for her time, apologize for delaying her return home, and mosey off to continue researching Village locales for possible future tours.

  Unlikely you'll run into Sean Lennon, or any of the Tomei clan, on a Save the Village tour, but several of the tour groups have run into famous faces, from Philip Glass to Mario Batali to Michael Stipe.   

  You won't see ANY of them while sitting at your desk, or on your couch, eating potato chips.

  So book a Save the Village tour today.

  Tell 'em Pete Hamill sent you.

          

North side of West 13th St., between 6th and 7th Aves.

North side of West 13th St., between 6th and 7th Aves.

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Amazing West 10th St.

  18 West 10th St.

  18 West 10th St.

  Three historic houses all in a row on West 10th St.: #12, where Emily Post wrote about etiquette, #14, where Mark Twain wrote all kinds of things, and #18, where Emma Lazarus wrote a poem that ended up on the Statue of Liberty... All part of the Save the Village tour!

  Book one today!

  On the façade at 14 West 10th St.

  On the façade at 14 West 10th St.

  The Post house. No steak served.

  The Post house. No steak served.

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Louisa May Alcott: Did she or didn't she?

 Joined townhouses at 130 and 132 MacDougal Street

 Joined townhouses at 130 and 132 MacDougal Street

  A recent tourgoer asked why Dylan and the Beats flocked to Greenwich Village. He asked right as the group was passing the building pictured here.

  Simply, it was the cheap rent for apartments that are now "quaint" and "vintage" and so on, but then were called dumps and were often cold-water flats. And the cheap rents had historically attracted creatively rich but financially challenged people, often artists, writers, playwrights, poets and the like.  

  And it is that history of Villagers like Poe and O'Neill and Dos Passos and Theodore Dreiser, Ezra Pound, and Sinclair Lewis that drew later waves of Bohemians.

  The residences at 130 and 132 MacDougal housed for many years Louisa May Alcott, not generally known as a Village person.

  And the debate rages on as to whether she wrote Little Women just across the street from where Café Reggio and Mamoun's Falafel and the Comedy Cellar would later take hold.

  Her uncle built and owned the place, and it is documented that she lived there for several years after the Civil War. One website writes, "In 1868, Louisa May Alcott sat at her desk before the second story window in her uncle’s house on MacDougal Street and penned the final paragraph of Little Women."

  Other sources say she wrote the novel at her family’s home, Orchard House, in Concord, Massachusetts. And in a period New York Times interview she said she wrote it in Boston.

  Regardless, Alcott was yet another famous Village literary denizen.

  And now the building is part of... wait for it... NYU and its law school. At least they didn't demolish the place, as they did with Edgar Allen Poe's place around the corner at 85 West 3rd St.

A 1940 postage stamp from a Famous Americans series.   

A 1940 postage stamp from a Famous Americans series.

 

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Flighty attraction

  In addition to the usual stops, the morning Save the Village tour group enjoyed seeing a pigeon aficionado in Washington Square Park.

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Here, There and Everywhere. Or, Big Ten

  One of the many shows with iconic McDarrah photos this summer is at the Pompidou Centre in Paris

  One of the many shows with iconic McDarrah photos this summer is at the Pompidou Centre in Paris

  We are aware of no other photographer on earth that is as well represented on museum and gallery walls this summer as Fred W. McDarrah.

  Iconic photos are on display at an incredible ten different locations. Plus inclusion in an upcoming show at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. And many more on the calendar.

  And photos from the archive continue to appear *daily* in the usual assortment of national magazines, books, auction catalogues, Presidential announceme...nt videos, New York City Parks dept. signs, textbooks, films, TV news broadcasts, posters, banners, CD and DVD covers, public and private collections, and newspapers.

  Plus the photos are the basis for walking tours!

1) Ed Ruscha: Ribbon Words
Edward Tyler Nahem Fine Art
37 W. 57th St.
New York, NY 10019

2) Inaugural Season
Dedicated to Hilton Als
The Artist’s Institute
132 E. 65th St.
New York, NY 10065

3) The 1970s: The Blossoming of a Queer Enlightenment
Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art
26 Wooster St.
New York, NY 10013

4) Fred W. McDarrah 42 Photos
The Grape & Vine at The Walker
52 W. 13th St.
New York, NY 10011

5) Activist New York
Museum of the City of New York
1220 Fifth Ave.
New York, NY 10029

6) Pop Art Fabrics & Fashion | from Warhol to Westwood
Nederlands Textielmuseum
Goirkestraat 96, 5046 GN
Tilburg, Netherlands

7) The Beat Generation
Le Centre National D’art et de Culture Georges Pompidou
Rue Beauborg, Place Georges-Pompidou
75004 Paris, France

8) The Velvet Underground: A New York Extravaganza with 92 McDarrah images on view
Philharmonie de Paris
221 Avenue Jean-Jaurès
75019 Paris, FRANCE

9) Role Play Across Art and Fashion
Museo Salvatore Ferragamo
Palazzo Spini Feroni
Piazza Santa Trinita 5/R, 50123 Florence

10) SHOOT! SHOOT! SHOOT! Photographs of the 1960s and 1970s from the Nicola Erni Collection of vintage prints by Fred W. McDarrah and others (Diane Arbus, Richard Avedon, Robert Mapplethorpe, Irving Penn, Helmut Newton, Ron Gallela, David Bailey and Bert Stern) of Art, Music, Fashion and FIlm in Paris, London and New York.
Muncher Stadtmuseum
St.-Jakobs-Platz 1 80331 MUNCHEN

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Hey! Ho! We Went!

Welcome to the show!

Welcome to the show!

  Since the Ramones figure into the Save the Village: The East Village tour, we thought it made sense to go see the exhibit at the Queens Museum about the real Fab Four, our favorite misfits from Forest Hills.

  Hard to fathom that tee shirts and records and posters we once threw out are now on the wall of a museum. But they are.

   And it is a terrific show. It is up until July 31.

   No Fred W. McDarrah photos, but some wonderful images by Bob Gruen and Roberta Bayley (who lives in Abbie Hoffman's old building on St. Mark's Place).

  Learn more about the Ramones and the East Village that embraced them on the East Village tour.

The Talking Heads opened for the Ramones when they played Bataclan, the Paris club that was attacked by terrorists last year.   

The Talking Heads opened for the Ramones when they played Bataclan, the Paris club that was attacked by terrorists last year.

 

It is a multimedia extravaganza!

It is a multimedia extravaganza!

Songs everyone can still dance to.

Songs everyone can still dance to.

What the Ramones conquered: The World. A model of which is right outside the museum's front door.

What the Ramones conquered: The World. A model of which is right outside the museum's front door.

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