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Save The Village


Walking Tours of the photographs

of Fred W. McDarrah

info@savethevillagetours.com / Tickets

CHOOSE A TOUR:

Save the Village

East Village / St. Marks Pl.

Stonewall

Artists

Beats / Bob (Dylan)

Private Tours

SCROLL DOWN

Save The Village


Walking Tours of the photographs

of Fred W. McDarrah

info@savethevillagetours.com / Tickets

CHOOSE A TOUR:

Save the Village

East Village / St. Marks Pl.

Stonewall

Artists

Beats / Bob (Dylan)

Private Tours


Washington Square Park, May 1959

Washington Square Park, May 1959

Save The Village

Every Saturday @ 10AM  

(Or by appointment for minimum four guests - e-mail info@savethevillagetours)

FEATURED IN THE NEW YORK TIMES AS A SELECT NEW YORK CITY WALKING TOUR. 

The original tour featuring the photos of Fred W. McDarrah. Based on a blockbuster photo exhibit of the same name that was on display at the Steven Kasher Gallery in Chelsea in 2014. So many individuals and groups came to the show, and there was such a positive media reaction to the exhibition and gallery workers were peppered on a daily basis with so many questions about the photos and the changing face of Greenwich Village....

The exhibition ended, but the interest in Greenwich Village in the 1960s and McDarrah's documentation of the changing scene did not wane one iota. So the Estate of Fred W. McDarrah decided to bring the people not to the gallery, but to the scenes that made the show such a success: the Greenwich Village locales documented by McDarrah during his tenure at the Village Voice – such as Washington Square Park; the Stonewall Inn, the birthplace of the modern day gay rights movement; and the various stomping grounds of the individuals he photographed that helped shape the 1960s ethos, including Bob Dylan, Andy Warhol and Jimi Hendrix.

 

The entrance to the boarded up Living Theater, where a man sleeps in the doorway, 69 West 14th St.,, October 20, 1965. The sign on the door reads, in part, 'The Living Theatre has been taxed out of existence by the US Gov't. Send your complains to' followed by an obscured name and the address of the Federal Court House in Foley Square.

The entrance to the boarded up Living Theater, where a man sleeps in the doorway, 69 West 14th St.,, October 20, 1965. The sign on the door reads, in part, 'The Living Theatre has been taxed out of existence by the US Gov't. Send your complains to' followed by an obscured name and the address of the Federal Court House in Foley Square.

High-angle exterior view outside the entrance to The Dom (from 'Polski Dom Narodowy' or 'Polish National Home', 23 St. Mark's Place), where a banner advertises 'Warhol; Live; The Velvet Underground; Live Dancing; Films; Party Event Now,' part of Andy Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable series of staged, multimedia events, March 31, 1966.

High-angle exterior view outside the entrance to The Dom (from 'Polski Dom Narodowy' or 'Polish National Home', 23 St. Mark's Place), where a banner advertises 'Warhol; Live; The Velvet Underground; Live Dancing; Films; Party Event Now,' part of Andy Warhol's Exploding Plastic Inevitable series of staged, multimedia events, March 31, 1966.

Masked members of the Bread & Puppet Theater stage a protest of the Vietnam War in Washington Square, March 15, 1965.

Masked members of the Bread & Puppet Theater stage a protest of the Vietnam War in Washington Square, March 15, 1965.

Tickets are $15 (Students, seniors, individuals with a valid library card, or a membership in a Historic Preservation Society, Group or Association) to $25 (Adult) and every ticket includes a keepsake postcard packet. 

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East Village / St. Marks Pl.


Every Friday @ 1 PM (or by appointment for minimum four guests - e-mail info@savethevillagetours)

  If Greenwich Village is the historic home of the counterculture, then the East Village can be called famous for its off-the-counter culture. On this tour, see where Chicago 8 defendant Jerry Rubin paraded down St. Mark's Place with a machine gun; the former Polish catering hall where the Velvet Underground played its first gigs under manager Andy Warhol (and the St. Mark's Place thrift shop where Warhol often shopped) and the former Fillmore East, the greatest rock venue in history. 

East Village / St. Marks Pl.


Every Friday @ 1 PM (or by appointment for minimum four guests - e-mail info@savethevillagetours)

  If Greenwich Village is the historic home of the counterculture, then the East Village can be called famous for its off-the-counter culture. On this tour, see where Chicago 8 defendant Jerry Rubin paraded down St. Mark's Place with a machine gun; the former Polish catering hall where the Velvet Underground played its first gigs under manager Andy Warhol (and the St. Mark's Place thrift shop where Warhol often shopped) and the former Fillmore East, the greatest rock venue in history. 

  Learn about the history of Tompkins Square Park, home of the long running gender identity celebration Wigstock and the annual Howl! Festival (named in honor of local resident Allen Ginsberg). The park is also where Indian Sadhu A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada came to sing and preach, beginning the Hare Krishna movement in 1966.  Includes Cooper Union where everyone from Abraham Lincoln to Anna Deveare Smith to Barack Obama to Hugo Chavez to Mark Twain have been featured speakers, the different immigrant waves that came to the neighborhood, where to get the best egg creams and the neighborhood bar that has hosted bands like Bad Brains, Minor Threat, Black Flag, Social Distortion and the Beastie Boys. Sometimes on the same bill.

  Also home to Leon Trotsky, Lady Gaga, W.H. Auden, Alan Cumming, Lenny Bruce, Madonna, Abbie Hoffman and to the famed Club 57, a church basement where in the late 1970s and early 1980s Ann MagnusonKeith Haring,  RuPaul, the B-52s, The Fleshtones, and Fab Five Freddy all performed.

Watched by an audience a circle of three man and three women hold hands as they dance together in Washington Square Park, New York, New York, July 1951.

Watched by an audience a circle of three man and three women hold hands as they dance together in Washington Square Park, New York, New York, July 1951.

American author Ambrose Hollingworth Redmoon (1933 - 1996, born James Neil Hollingworth) and his companion, identified only as Louise, walk along MacDougal Street (just past the intersection with Minetta Lane), New York, New York, June 21, 1959. Redmoon later became the manager of the rock group Quicksilver Messenger Service and, after suffering a near fatal injury in a car crash, became an author. Visible in the background are the Minetta Tavern and the Players Theatre.

American author Ambrose Hollingworth Redmoon (1933 - 1996, born James Neil Hollingworth) and his companion, identified only as Louise, walk along MacDougal Street (just past the intersection with Minetta Lane), New York, New York, June 21, 1959. Redmoon later became the manager of the rock group Quicksilver Messenger Service and, after suffering a near fatal injury in a car crash, became an author. Visible in the background are the Minetta Tavern and the Players Theatre.

Cafe Bizarre, 106 West 3rd Street, June 7, 1959. In the 1960s the house band was The Velvet Underground. Andy Warhol saw them perform, became their manager, and the rest is history. 

Cafe Bizarre, 106 West 3rd Street, June 7, 1959. In the 1960s the house band was The Velvet Underground. Andy Warhol saw them perform, became their manager, and the rest is history. 

Tickets are $15 (Students, seniors, individuals with a valid library card, or a membership in a Historic Preservation Society, Group or Association) to $25 (Adult) and every ticket includes a keepsake postcard packet. 

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Stonewall and Gay Greenwich Village


Every Wednesday @ 11AM  (or by appointment for minimum four guests - e-mail info@savethevillagetours)


As the photographer for the Village Voice, the only (somewhat) mainstream media outlet on Earth paying serious and respectful attention to gay issues and events in the 1960s and 1970s, Fred W. McDarrah amassed what is generally regarded as the largest collection of gay-themed documentary photos taken by one individual, ever.  

Stonewall and Gay Greenwich Village


Every Wednesday @ 11AM  (or by appointment for minimum four guests - e-mail info@savethevillagetours)


As the photographer for the Village Voice, the only (somewhat) mainstream media outlet on Earth paying serious and respectful attention to gay issues and events in the 1960s and 1970s, Fred W. McDarrah amassed what is generally regarded as the largest collection of gay-themed documentary photos taken by one individual, ever.  

A group of young people celebrate outside the Stonewall Inn, 53 Christopher Street, after riots over the weekend of June 27, 1969. The bar and surrounding area were the site of a series of demonstrations and riots that led to the formation of the modern gay rights movement in the United States.

A group of young people celebrate outside the Stonewall Inn, 53 Christopher Street, after riots over the weekend of June 27, 1969. The bar and surrounding area were the site of a series of demonstrations and riots that led to the formation of the modern gay rights movement in the United States.

Tickets are $15 (Students, seniors, individuals with a valid library card, or a membership in a Historic Preservation Society, Group or Association) to $25 (Adult) and every ticket includes a keepsake postcard packet. 

On this tour, see where so many of the iconic photos were taken, how they fit into the history of the movement, of Greenwich Village and so much more. 

McDarrah images have become the signature photos of what is now inclusively referred to as LGBTQ+ history, and his photos were featured by the Barack Obama White House in the video announcing the Stonewall National Monument in 2016 (https://youtu.be/ywtvJyXDWkk).

As with all Save The Village tours, with the Stonewall tour every ticket includes a free keepsake postcard packet of photos, many of which are sure to be viewed and displayed worldwide as Stonewall 50 approaches in June 2019. 

Come and see where it all happened on the ONLY regularly scheduled, guided and illustrated tour of its kind!

Portrait of American gay rights activist Craig Rodwell as he holds a bumper-sticker sized sign that reads 'Gay is Good' over his eyes, New York, New York, October 14, 1969. Rodwell was the founder of the Oscar Wilde Memorial Bookstore, the first bookstore in the country devoted exclusively to works by gay and lesbian authors.

Portrait of American gay rights activist Craig Rodwell as he holds a bumper-sticker sized sign that reads 'Gay is Good' over his eyes, New York, New York, October 14, 1969. Rodwell was the founder of the Oscar Wilde Memorial Bookstore, the first bookstore in the country devoted exclusively to works by gay and lesbian authors.

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the Artist's world


Every Wednesday @ 2 pm (or by appointment for minimum four guests - e-mail info@savethevillagetours)

the Artist's world


Every Wednesday @ 2 pm (or by appointment for minimum four guests - e-mail info@savethevillagetours)

LIKE THE SAVE THE VILLAGE TOUR, THE ARTIST'S World TOUR IS BASED ON ANOTHER GALLERY EXHIBIT, FRED W. MCDARRAH: THE ARTIST'S WORLD, AT THE STEVEN KASHER GALLERY IN SPRING 2015. 

This tour starts in Soho and ends on the steps of Willem deKooning's old East Village studio, and references everything and everyone from Edward Hooper's Nighthawks and Ruth Kligman's gallery to the place Andy Warhol bought vintage clothes and the studio where Matthew Brady photographed Abraham Lincoln.

See where Robert Rauschenberg inadvertently started the sushi craze in New York City over 40 years ago. What other tour can offer you that!?

And all of this took place below 14th St.

While Fred W. McDarrah's 250,000-image archive is an encyclopedic catalog of the people, places, movements, trends and events of the New York scene over the second half of the 20th century, his collection of photographs of artists is truly unique and often the sole visual record of a special time and place in the history of American art. 

McDarrah's interest in photographing artists can be traced to a 1949 visit to Falmouth, MA, a town on Cape Cod. Through a mutual friend, he was introduced that summer to painter William Littlefield (1902-1969). Littlefield, who came from a wealthy family, had studied in Paris, counted Mrs. John D. Rockefeller among his first patrons and was a window into a world McDarrah, who came from poverty and matriculated on the streets of Brooklyn, had never previously seen.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beginning in the 1940s, Littlefield and sculptor Philip Pavia hosted informal gatherings at The Club, an artist membership association that first met at the old Waldorf Cafeteria, at 6th Avenue and 8th Street. Over the years, the Club moved to Broadway, to East 14th Street, to 10th Street and 4th Avenue, to 2nd Avenue, to St. Marks Place, and finally to Mercer Street, not far from its original home. The Club hosted seminars, panels, parties, talks, readings and other events where artists of the day would share and exchange ideas and opinions. The Club and its activities were central to the creation of the Abstract Expressionist movement and The New York School. Many of The Club's members lived and worked within a few blocks of its doors: Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, Ad Reinhardt, James Brooks, Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, Robert Rauschenberg, Jack Tworkov, Alfred Leslie, Milton Resnick, Lee Krasner, Philip Guston, William Baziotes, Robert Motherwell, Nicholas Krushenick and Adolph Gottlieb.

At Littlefield's invitation, McDarrah attended events at The Club and eventually became the doorman and keeper of the mailing list, cultivating relationships with many of the member artists. Often, he'd have his camera and unobtrusively document the world of the artists he had become a part of.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On some occasions, a non-artist with a connection to The Club attended an event, such as Jack Kerouac, who did a cameo on the drums at the 1958 New Year's Eve party.

Sensing the cultural importance of the moment, McDarrah then decided to capture all he could with his camera, which resulted in the seminal 1961 book, The Artist's World in Pictures (text by Gloria McDarrah, Introduction by Thomas B. Hess, EP Dutton, New York 204 pages).

After that, the next generation of artists - including Pop icons Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg, Tom Wesselmann, Jim Dine, Jasper Johns, Dan Flavin, John Chamberlain, Frank Stella, Donald Judd, Robert Indiana and James Rosenquist - often sought out McDarrah and coverage in the Village Voice, where McDarrah had a day job as an advertising salesman and was the staff photographer. Warhol would often call McDarrah at home in the early days, hoping he would take his photo and use it in the Voice, one of the few periodicals giving serious coverage to the Pop genre - and to women artists. McDarrah's archive also includes rare images of Marisol, Eva Hesse, Yayoi Kusama, Carolee Schneemann, Rosalyn Drexler, Hanna Wilke, Niki de Saint Phalle, Marisol, Faith Ringgold, Alice Neel and Marjorie Strider.

Tickets are $15 (Students, seniors, individuals with a valid library card, or a membership in a Historic Preservation Society, Group or Association) to $25 (Adult) and every ticket includes a keepsake postcard packet. 

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the Beats and Bob(DylAn)


Every Saturday @ 1 PM   (or by appointment for minimum four guests - e-mail info@savethevillagetours)

 

  Bob Dylan and the Beat Generation poets - Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, Peter Orlovsky, Gregory Corso and the rest - all were products of a postwar culture that lauded Eisenhower and the Military-Industrial complex, Father Knows Best, the John Birch Society and the KKK.
  In song and in verse, Dylan and the Beats rebelled against that way of life and became touchstones of a new generation.
  Fred W. McDarrah, the longtime Village Voice photographer and picture editor, was right there with his camera as it happened.  
  The worlds of Dylan and the Beat poets overlapped in many ways. The Beats and Bob tour will visit the coffee houses, clubs, and other venues (some remaining, some not) where the Beats made literary history. And when Dylan met Ginsberg in Eli Wilentz's apartment above the 8th St. Bookshop in 1963, the two began a lifelong friendship. Dylan was well familiar with the Beat poets when he left Minnesota for Greenwich Village in 1961. The tour stops at the MacDougal Street club were Dylan first performed, the bars he frequented and often performed at, and some of his Village homes, hangouts and hideouts.

the Beats and Bob(DylAn)


Every Saturday @ 1 PM   (or by appointment for minimum four guests - e-mail info@savethevillagetours)

 

  Bob Dylan and the Beat Generation poets - Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, Peter Orlovsky, Gregory Corso and the rest - all were products of a postwar culture that lauded Eisenhower and the Military-Industrial complex, Father Knows Best, the John Birch Society and the KKK.
  In song and in verse, Dylan and the Beats rebelled against that way of life and became touchstones of a new generation.
  Fred W. McDarrah, the longtime Village Voice photographer and picture editor, was right there with his camera as it happened.  
  The worlds of Dylan and the Beat poets overlapped in many ways. The Beats and Bob tour will visit the coffee houses, clubs, and other venues (some remaining, some not) where the Beats made literary history. And when Dylan met Ginsberg in Eli Wilentz's apartment above the 8th St. Bookshop in 1963, the two began a lifelong friendship. Dylan was well familiar with the Beat poets when he left Minnesota for Greenwich Village in 1961. The tour stops at the MacDougal Street club were Dylan first performed, the bars he frequented and often performed at, and some of his Village homes, hangouts and hideouts.

American writers Jack Kerouac (left), Albert Saijo (right, with glasses), and Lew Welch sit around a low table as they collaborate on a poem, which is typed by Gloria Schoffel in the apartment (304 W. 14th St.) of her and her soon-to-be husband, photographer McDarrah, December 10, 1959. The poem was entitled 'This is a Poem by Albert Saijo, Lew Welch, and Jack Kerouac' (later published as 'Trip Trap'), and was based on the trio's journey from San Francisco to New York in Welch's car.

American writers Jack Kerouac (left), Albert Saijo (right, with glasses), and Lew Welch sit around a low table as they collaborate on a poem, which is typed by Gloria Schoffel in the apartment (304 W. 14th St.) of her and her soon-to-be husband, photographer McDarrah, December 10, 1959. The poem was entitled 'This is a Poem by Albert Saijo, Lew Welch, and Jack Kerouac' (later published as 'Trip Trap'), and was based on the trio's journey from San Francisco to New York in Welch's car.

  The Village has a long history of literary achievement and social activism with both words and song, which was part of the draw for the Beats and Bob.

   Thomas Paine wrote "Common Sense" in a still existing townhouse on Grove Street. And writers like Truman Capote, Norman Mailer, John Dos Passos, John Reed, Mark Twain, William Styron,  Willa Cather, James Baldwin, O. Henry, Edward Albee, Eugene O'Neill, Hart Crane, Edgar Allen Poe, Walt Whitman, Thomas Wolfe, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Djuna Barnes and Dawn Powell (Google those last two, kids, if the names don't ring a bell) have called the Village home.

  So did Pete Seeger and Woody Guthrie and Leadbelly.

  McDarrah's books including The Beat Scene, Kerouac and Friends A Beat Generation Album and his more personal Glory Days: Beat Generation in Greenwich Village earned him the title, "the Bachrach of New York's Bohemia" from the New York Times.

  And his photo of Dylan saluting in Sheridan Square is possibly the most famous photo of Dylan ever taken.

Tickets are $15 (Students, seniors, individuals with a valid library card, or a membership in a Historic Preservation Society, Group or Association) to $25 (Adult) and every ticket includes a keepsake postcard packet. 

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Private Tours


Private Tours


All tours are available for private bookings. Custom or combination tours can also be arranged depending on the needs and wants of your group. We can do everything from Fashion/Shopping tours to eating tours, crime scene tours, celebrity Real Estate tours and more. Private tours can be scheduled morning, afternoon or evening, seven days per week. Private tours can range from one person to several dozen. For more information, or to schedule a private walk, please email us at info@savethevillagetours.com